Hey European people..

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by WeedZ, Dec 9, 2015.

  1. WeedZ
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    WeedZ Possibly an Enlightened Being

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    Do countries in Europe (mainly England) require citizenship or anything to get a job there? The US requires either citizenship or a work visa which usually lasts only a couple years.
     
  2. barronwaffles

    barronwaffles GBAtemp Regular

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    You don't need anything if you enter illegally.
     
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  3. WeedZ
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    WeedZ Possibly an Enlightened Being

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    Well I'm not swimming.
     
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  4. barronwaffles

    barronwaffles GBAtemp Regular

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    Doesn't seem like many of the 'refugees' can either.
     
  5. WeedZ
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    WeedZ Possibly an Enlightened Being

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    I think that's the first time I've ever choked on my own spit. Thanks for that.
     
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  6. Deboog

    Deboog GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    No. To live or work in Europe you need to been an EU citizen.

    EDIT: I'm sure there's a visa for this type of thing, but I have no idea about that.
     
    Last edited by Deboog, Dec 9, 2015
  7. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Yeah to live or work anywhere in the world that is not somewhere you were born or that does not have a very serious agreement (the EU has agreements that any country within it can have its citizens live and work in any other EU country, though it can get complex and you may still have to register in the country you are in even if it is just a simple formality, as a US citizen then you can do kind of similar things in Canada http://www.canadavisa.com/canada-immigration-usa-citizens.html ) you are going to need various tickets. How annoying these are to get varies with country. In most cases it helps if you have a parent, spouse (the EU is not as big on marriage as US immigration is/was but it does not hurt), possibly kids and in some cases more distant relatives (some places will accept grandparents, or have a path for that). If you have some desired skills then that can work, and indeed is probably a bit easier in many cases than the US equivalent, and if you have an actual job offer then great. Afraid you are on your own to find what goes there and it varies by country and even region within it, though languages, medicine (doctor can be easier but nursing shortages are far from unheard of), teaching, some of the less common sciences, some kinds of mining are good bets.
    If you are going to retain US citizenship you do still have things you are supposed to do as well -- I believe you are supposed to continue to file some form of tax return, even if you have not set foot on US soil the entire year.

    http://www.visalogic.net/uk/work-permits/4/124 looks like a good overview for a lot of the UK stuff. If you are not going to become a citizen of a EU country then US citizen working in ?? is a good search, here is one for Germany http://germany.usembassy.gov/acs/working_in_germany/

    Also while I am saying EU it does not necessarily mean what you think of as Europe (for instance Switzerland is not in the EU)


    Also to be a pedant I do have to point out in the US a green card is not citizenship and will allow the owner of it to do basically everything that is not serious government work (you won't be able to join the FBI sort of thing). It does need to be renewed but unlike extending a work visa it is usually a matter of paying for someone to rubber stamp a form and also unlike several flavours of work visa you can change jobs as readily as anybody else.
     
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  8. WeedZ
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    WeedZ Possibly an Enlightened Being

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    Thanks. That post was really helpful. Well at least it gives me a place to start. I don't get all the politics. Why can't I just be like 'I want to be over here now.'?
     
  9. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    I am in favour of "Come one, come all. Also we tried isolation; it does not work". Historically for resource distribution and possibly security reasons it could have made sense, less sure that applies now.

    Comedy video time
     
  10. Deboog

    Deboog GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Rich powerful countries always have strict rules on citizenship. As bad as America looks these days with Mexican deportations and whatnot, America is one of the most generous first world countries in the world when in comes to citizenship. Most countries, if you're born there, but neither of your parents are citizens, tough shit, get out of the country because you aren't a citizen either. Anyway, to be blunt, it's to stop people from poorer nations from migrating and taking the resources first world countries like to keep for themselves, healthcare, schooling, etc. Of course the U.S. is anything but poor, but writing a law that says "nobody allowed unless they're loaded" doesn't go over too well, so you're in the same boat as someone from Chad. Well, not really, because you have skills that make it easier for you to get a visa, but still.
     
    Last edited by Deboog, Dec 9, 2015
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  11. mashers

    mashers Stubborn ape

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    Do you think it's funny when dead Syrian children wash up on foreign shores?
     
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  12. Heran Bago

    Heran Bago Where do puyo come from?

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    You need a Visa. Not the credit card kind, the passport kind.

    If you're a millionaire you can get a visa to live in most countries as a potential investor. If that applies to you then good for you but also screw you.

    You can get a 'looking for work' visa in most European countries, and once you find a suitable job you can convert it to a work Visa. There are many different kind of Visas depending on type of employment or freelance stuff.

    You mentioned that work Visas only last a couple years, but they can be renewed.

    The easiest Visa to get is a student Visa. You can study in any country you want. If you have the money to throw at moving internationally, going to school in your target country or city is a great way to do it. You can look for work late in your education.

    These are all methods of legal residency. Not citizenship which grants certain rights like voting and draft eligibility.


    You could also marry someone with citizenship.
     
    Last edited by Heran Bago, Dec 9, 2015
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  13. Xenon Hacks

    Xenon Hacks GBAtemp Guru

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    Mein fuhrer
     
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  14. sarkwalvein

    sarkwalvein More coffee, please!

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    Maybe it is out of place, maybe it is bad taste.
    Call me cold hearted if you wish, but I find that joke funny anyway.
    And of course I don't like people drowning in the sea while escaping war, that is terrible.
    Nevertheless, that can't stop me finding that joke funny.
    That's true, but AFAIK work visas can be converted to permanent residence permit in some countries with certain conditions.
    E.g., here in Germany if you stay for 5 years in a row (perhaps working with a visa), you can apply for permanent residence.
    Germany is beautiful, specially if you want to come to a peaceful place in Europe.
    (haters gonna hate perhaps, I don't care)
     
    Last edited by sarkwalvein, Dec 9, 2015
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  15. CosmoCortney

    CosmoCortney The Hacker Furry

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    In most countries od the Europen Uniun you can. This is determined by the Schengen Agreement, which allows you to cross country borders without controls (might be a different case now due the terrorism and refugee situation. But as I went to Finland this year they didn't even want to see my passport). This agreement also allows you to work as what you want
     
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  16. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Not quite. Schengen is not the EU and does indeed allow you to travel and stay (possibly for a shorter length of time) in a place, working is a slightly different matter though you probably can still get it but it is not automatic/bundled within that. The more notable exceptions being Switzerland https://www.ch.ch/en/working-switzerland-eu-efta/ and Norway which participate in Schengen but not the EU (though they are in the old EFTA and EEA), likewise the UK and Ireland are in the EU but not in Schengen.

    "This agreement also allows you to work as what you want"
    Just to be a grammatical pedant/literalist, but also with a potential kicker for some with older qualifications and not ones that are immediately obvious*, I should mention that you may find yourself going to a place where a given job is a protected trade name or similar -- the country of your flag having some interesting approaches to the idea of engineering compared to a lot of other places in the world ( https://www.vde.com/de/Karriere/Ber...ationoftheEngineeringProfessioninGermany.aspx )

    *obvious stuff would be things like law, though even there the UK is a country but moving to Scotland from elsewhere in the UK will probably see you have to do a conversion course http://www.lawscot.org.uk/education...-a-scottish-solicitor/intra-uk-transfer-test/ . Less obvious stuff would be various medical professions as a lot of them did not have their qualifications harmonised or respected between countries until somewhat recently.