1. Cryptocurrency Warning:
    The risks of trading cryptocurrencies are mainly related to its volatility. They are high-risk and speculative and it is important that you understand the risks before you start trading. They are volatile: unexpected changes in market sentiment can lead to sharp and sudden moves in price.
    Please be aware that any information provided here can be the opinion of the author. Trade at your own risk.
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  1. Chary

    OP Chary Never sleeps
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    When the market crashed in March, I think a lot of younger people started taking notice of the stock market and investing. Are you one of them? Or maybe you’ve been investing since even before everything went crazy. Let’s see how many Tempers play the stocks.
     
  2. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Legend
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    Sadly, I'm not qualified or knowledgeable about stocks to do such a thing. I'm sure is highly technical knowledge (I don't mean technology, I mean intricate information) but I haven't really learned about that. I always thought it was a trendy thing to worry about, but I didn't have interest in it. People must either be rich or broke doing that. :ninja:
     
  3. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer
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    I follow the markets but don't invest. Would sooner buy tools that can be directly used to earn me something. Could probably get more doing stocks, or at least have that passive income stream, but eh.

    Don't fall for the lies. Certainly you can lose your shirt if you take your eye off the ball, and there are a few tricks you can do to help with taxes (creating virtual losses to make your net profits appear low but your actual profits be high) but anybody that works in stocks will tell you most of them are clueless and only care about the next quarter or maybe end of year returns and might not know anything about the industry in general (instead they will look at ratings, stock sales volumes, sales trends, broadly whether any news is positive or negative and the like).
    "Buy low, sell high" is the general order of the day or maybe consider short selling if you think something is about to drop. Try to have a selection of things in unrelated industries so one tanking does not drop your entire portfolio.

    Indeed if you know something or can see beyond that you can do well -- you probably follow games so if Rockstar only released a mediocre game this quarter and did not make money and people sold it low but you know the next GTA is 6 months away you can buy it when it is low (it is not like they are going to go bust too soon) and then when GTA drops you can then either sell when it goes high or wait for the dividend if there is one (some companies will give a share of profits every year to their stock holders).
    If a game leaks ahead of street date and early reviews from that are that it is awful you might then consider shorting the stock. Here you effectively say in 5 days or whatever I will give you ? shares of this company if you pay me now, 5 days (or however long) goes by and you then have to deliver, however as the game has presumably been released and has tanked then the stock will be lower than predicted (if a game company only makes money when games release and it is not selling...)
    You also want to keep an eye on whether something is over valued or under valued. Sticking with games then when pokemon go dropped and got massive Nintendo saw a massive spike in price, at least until people realised it was not Nintendo getting all the money from it.

    Learn to keep your emotions out of it and learn that it is about money and not necessarily the quality of the product.
     
  4. Ryccardo

    Ryccardo watching Thames TV from London
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    Not really, with regards to the spirit of the OP - I am into long-term managed funds, so I don't deal with individual companies/countries, and the last time I changed the distribution was about a year ago
     
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  5. GhostLatte

    GhostLatte GBAtemp's Official Van Master™
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    Yes, I have started
     
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  6. JoeDirtt

    JoeDirtt Member
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    I would like to but don't know how to go about it exactly

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  7. The Real Jdbye

    The Real Jdbye Always Remember 30/07/08
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    Stocks? Who cares about stocks. Cryptocurrency is where it's at. :D
     
  8. JoeDirtt

    JoeDirtt Member
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    Alot of people say that I would be interested in that too but it's hard to find direction on what to do exactly.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  9. cauliquackers

    cauliquackers GBAtemp Regular
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    Not enough money to invest to even make it worth the time ahaha
     
  10. The Real Jdbye

    The Real Jdbye Always Remember 30/07/08
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    Easy way is to buy BTC on Coinbase (the only site AFAIK that takes cards, otherwise it takes a few days to do a money transfer), transfer it to Coinbase Pro (need to sign up there separately, but that's the exchange part of Coinbase that has all sorts of currencies and lets you put in buy/sell offers rather than just buying at whatever the current price is, and there is an option somewhere in your Coinbase Pro wallet to transfer assets from Coinbase) and then you have a lot of reading up/watching of YouTube videos to do to get caught up on the top cryptos available, how to use the exchanges, and beyond that it's up to you if you want to hold long term, or do short term trades buying when the value goes down, sell when it has gone up a bit, waiting for it to go lower again etc.. But knowing when to buy and when to sell is a skill that's hard to master and there is no easy way to learn that besides experience. Right now BTC is looking good to hold mid/long term though since it's rising significantly.
    There are many other exchanges, but on Coinbase you have everything conveniently in one place (you can buy BTC/ETC and a couple others right on the site, and easily convert back to USD, hold USD on the exchange or withdraw it, things most exchanges don't do as they trade in crypto exclusively)
     
    Last edited by The Real Jdbye, Jul 30, 2020
  11. chrisrlink

    chrisrlink Has a PhD in dueling
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    considering how the US and world market is today I wouldn't even try it's more likely a 2nd great depression will occur than a market upswing
     
  12. Lucifer666

    Lucifer666 all the world needs is me
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    I actually did! I made my first investment in mid May. Net change in value is +25% as of today, I wish I had put more in.
     
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  13. PizzaBitez

    PizzaBitez Shadow Clone Justu.
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    Nope but im wanting too. Maybe I will use robinhood to start.
     
  14. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer
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    There is money to be made when the market is going down. See short selling. There will also be companies that survive and possibly thrive during that.

    There are a thousand different ways and how much money you have to invest also changes what is available (more money down, more options and possibly cheaper options).

    Still there are three main areas

    1) Company stocks

    2) Foreign Exchange (Forex)

    3) Commodities and futures contracts

    Forex is something you typically see advertised on late night TV and the volatility is enough to really make it hard. Still the idea is that as not everybody uses the same money and anybody that has been on holiday to different countries over different years will tell you at times it is harder or easier.
    For instance I was in the US once when 1 British pound would buy 2 US dollars. The British pound however has since taken a massive tumble and at one point was almost one to one exchange rate.
    If I had bought 500 GBP worth of US Dollars back then and sold it when it changed to 1:1 then I would have 1000 GPB minus any conversion rates and possibly taxes as governments may consider this a profit or gain in value of assets.
    You can do this anywhere you can change money, though more expensive conversions or worse rates offered by some places (buying 10000 from a bank is a better rate than changing 50 when you are on the ground in the middle of a tourist district, assuming it has not changed radically overnight as say a war kicked off) mean you need bigger swings to make a profit.

    Company stocks have two main elements. One is private stuff (here you might be given stock for working in a company and can potentially sell it on, though you do want to be careful there as you might have contracts or insider trading concerns to worry about), can also do it with people on the street though people on the street don't always have the biggest selection. The other far more popular one is stock exchanges. Various countries will have many and different companies might be on one or more (indeed differences between them, possibly including the exchange stuff above, can be a way people make money).
    Anyway normal people don't speak to the stock exchange -- 100 million and expertise is about the lowest buy in for a lot of those so you get to go to middlemen called stock brokers and there are a million of these doing various things and costing various amounts to trade, store your stocks with them/have an account with them, automatically sell things or buy things for you and otherwise manage your stuff if you want that.
    With said stock brokers you can do various things. Buy stocks when they are low valued and sell them when they go higher (the company they are for maybe making a new successful product that brings in enough money to pay down debts, pay for manufacture, advertising, salaries....) aka "buy low, sell high". There are a thousand other factors to look at in this (debt to income ratio, how well the sector in general is doing (you might have a company selling landline phones but that is not exactly a growth market looking at the future), profits for some though not all (see Amazon profits vs stock price), overpriced vs underpriced stocks, sales volumes (see rats from a sinking ship, people following the herd or people realising there is a good thing going) and on and on and on. Any publicly traded stocks will have lots of info about them by law.). One phrase you will want to know is diversification -- you might know all the computer games, the financial health of their parent companies, and their upcoming qualities and have invested accordingly but if everybody goes poor because a massive war started and everybody is struggling to buy food it is no good, to that end you probably want a selection of things from a selection of industries.
    Many stocks will also allow you to vote in company meetings on the direction they are taking.
    Said stocks also often pay something called dividends. These are shares of profits paid to investors as thanks for investing in them. Not all companies pay them (not paying them makes your stock go up a bit in some cases, and will tend to rise if dividends are about to be paid).
    You can also do something called shorting stocks. Here you look at a company, realise that its next product is going to tank so you then have the option to do a short. This means you say I will give you say 10 shares in company X in 5 days if you pay me either today's price or some price you otherwise agree on, someone will take you up on that and in 5 days you have to deliver or be fined/have to use your insurance (no insurance options is called naked short selling and might well be illegal or very legally tricky to do). In 5 days the product has hopefully tanked and the stock prices match accordingly, the difference in price is then your profit.
    Not every company is on the stock exchange (or an exchange) and will instead be called a private company, though you might still have shares in them if you did work for them, invested in them early on (see private equity, angel investors and venture capital), got bought out by them (stocks are worth money so someone might pay in stock when buying something)... When a company turns from being private to being public they will have an initial public offering, here some shares may be offered ahead of time and the market will then hopefully figure out what it is worth. Traditionally said IPOs were a way to make a lot of money quickly as they were usually sold/given a low value relative to what they stabilised at, however not always (see Facebook's IPO where it practically tanked, though if you had held on for a while afterwards you would have made all that and more).

    There is also something called spread betting which you will encounter early on. This is quite literally a gambling setup (money you make at it counts as proceeds of gambling for most places) set to mirror the market, and usually very expensive (if you lose you lose, if you win then they might take 10% and beating the market by 10%, never mind 10% and a bit more to actually still make a profit, is a feat next to nobody does, including the very expensive hedge funds that get paid millions to attempt to do that). At the same time it is probably easier to join one of those than it is to join this forum or sign up for an account on an online shop.


    Index funds. These are things various companies offer where you buy one in every share on a stock exchange (a stock exchange is basically an "index" of stocks available on it), or a fraction of their collection (1 share is one share but you can split the value 50/50 with your friend if you want, same idea here). If you sell/cash out when the price has risen you keep the profit (minus any fees for that) and when the dividends for the companies come in you also get a cut of that (or maybe have it reinvested).
    For instance if you invested in the FTSE 100 (probably the biggest market in the UK and one of the main ones in the world) in February 2016 it was in the 5700 range, in January this year it was up around 7600. You will never ever get that with a savings account (3% per year is ridiculously generous there and things are usually between 1% per year and 2%). Of course immediately after that we had this virus lark so it was 5190 in mid March which is less than the previous low point in 2016 (you lost money if you sell, though you might still have earned dividends, and lost even more had you bought in during January's high point). Closed today at 6131 though, which also means if you bought in March at the low point you would have about 10% profit over the course of a few months, even while everybody is decrying how hard this year is to live in.
    These index funds and savings accounts are also what people compare against. You might be some ridiculous savant that spends 20 hours a day reading news, building a machine to read even more news (seriously it is a thing, as is robots writing the news in the first place), building a machine to buy and sell faster than you can press a button (see high frequency trading), knowing all the science of everything that is happening, reading early previews of all the games and films coming out to know what profits they will make, but make a few bad calls in there (you are going to eventually, sometimes even by choice as a tax dodge*) and if the net result if "would have made more by buying an index fund and forgetting about it", or even should have left it to gather interest in a bank account then yeah.
    At the same time if you earn say 50K a year after tax, cost of living is about 30K and you invest said 20K in a savings account every year (about 1.6K every month) then after 40 years at 1.6% you will have about 1.1 million vs the 800000 that just sticking it under the mattress will give (compound interest is a wonderful thing), start that at 20 and you can retire happily at 60 without ever touching the stock market, if you earn more money in your life (say by working your way up) but keep your expenses low (you will probably have paid off your mortgage by this point, and can even sell your house to one of those companies that buys houses and takes it when you die) and that is even more money. Start at 30 doing the same thing and that 1.6% looks like more 740000 -- unless you are going with the .45 retirement plan it pays to start early there, kids. Rate of inflation (the rate at things get more expensive with time) is usually under 1% and why sticking things under the mattress is a bad idea but keep an eye there.

    *If I buy shares in company X at 100 and they fall to 50 I might sell them, tell the tax man I made a loss of half whatever I sold on but if I made a profit on something else then the tax man only cares about my net profits there even though no money technically left my account when I sold at a loss. It gets far more complicated than that so go read a book on playing accountant/investor but that is the general idea.

    Commodities is real stuff, futures contracts is somewhat like shorting above but often viewed as more positive.
    Anyway when someone sucks oil out of the ground it does have to go somewhere. To this end people pay for stuff and eventually are duty bound to deliver it or pay fines. This delivered part is why you might have heard about oil this year having people paid to take it from them (as everybody was sitting at home then nobody was driving anywhere, never mind miles per gallon it was weeks per gallon and all that, and thus oil demand dropped through the floor).
    Precious metals, things you burn for energy, energy itself at times, gems, regular metals and other chemicals**, food and other bulk goods all play in this world.
    Futures is usually some investors agree to pay say 500 per tonne of something (say pork). If all your pigs get a cold that year and the meat is awful and only selling for 400 (or maybe there is just so much of it that prices drop -- see supply and demand, or I have to sell this pig before it rots so just give me something) then the farmer does not lose out but the investors do, on the other hand if all the pigs end up producing wonderful meat or it is just really rare that year (see China this last year or so) as everybody was doing something else and it sells for 600 per tonne the farm already agreed on 500 so the futures people can either turn around and sell it on, or as said investors might actually be a restaurant and don't find themselves paying through the nose for something used to make their most popular dish they can be happy and either pocket the difference or sell things cheap and undercut their competitors. Or if you prefer the supposedly beloved mcrib is often used as an example here of Mcdonalds or whatever seeing pork prices drop low enough that they can afford to sell it at whatever low price they need to so as to sell it and not mess up their perception as cheap food, in reality they probably have futures contracts as they always want bacon, ham and whatever else so don't want to be stung by prices if they don't have to so it is in fact probably marketing, and as they want so much of it then farmers are OK with a consistent income rather than wild profits one year and losses the next.

    **see Alberta sulphur pyramids. It is a byproduct of oil extraction so they stack it up until the prices rise high enough that they can sell it for a decent profit.

    Cryptocurrency mentioned above is some weird combo of forex (it can be used as money) and investment commodity (it is a good people invest in), and that is before we wonder about regulations. There are a million different ones but mostly it is bitcoin and all the rest (sometimes collectively called altcoins), and all the rest is still mostly about 5 different things and the rest of the million. You can use them to do all sorts of things like dodging fees (your bank might charge you to shift money overseas, far easier with bitcoin), buying drugs (they are able to be anonymous if you know what you are doing), and investing (the rate of exchange per coin is generally increasing, and over the last 10 or so years is not just 1% or so from a savings account or 10-20% from indexes but hundreds or thousands of percent, and at various points also drops massively (altcoins even more so). Where it will go in the future we don't know -- there could be a better coin doing more come out (bitcoin is just coins, some things do contracts and other nice features or have less of the downfalls of bitcoin), some regulators could crack down on it (if China, the US and Europe stopped it tomorrow because it funded something they don't like then yeah). You buy this on exchanges, from randoms on the internet or in real life, I have seen machines in malls that allow you to stick a card in and send it to a virtual "wallet" and you can also "mine" it which is to say kick over some computing power to help the cause and if you/your team wins the round of mining then they get paid for their troubles in more coins

    There are further things like buying debt bundles*, buying debt from governments (the US is unlikely to go bankrupt so while the fractions of a percent offered on it is low if you had 100 million to invest said 0.5% is still a lot of money per year and if you need low risk then government bonds as they are called are not a bad plan, this is also one of the things that is referred to when central banks set interest rates though that can be more for loans to big banks than bonds).
    *the mortgage market is usually a good one here. One person buying 1 house for 200000 is risky as they might lose their job, 10 people on the other hand can weather the loss of 1 in the group and still come out on top so people bundle it together and sell the bundle, or access to various tiers of the bundle (low risk paying less than high risk). This works well until everybody is an idiot and gives a loan to everybody with a pulse that takes the needle out of their arm for long enough to sign the paper but says they are all billionaire trust fund super healthy 25 year year old marathon running brain surgeons, aka what caused the housing collapse from a few years back and what we will probably see again before the end of this year, or maybe early next year, as similar things are happening again along with some other fun in the market courtesy of kung flu.
    You can also buy debt from companies that failed to collect but that is a slightly different one.


    This is not even the tip of the iceberg, though should allow you to start looking... or if you prefer there is a reason people take years/decades to earn qualifications to allow them to play in this field and earn fortunes doing so.
     
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  15. x65943

    x65943 the end is nigh, buy doge coin
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    Christianity got me too hard as a kid and I can't shake the idea that gambling is wrong. I haven't touched it. Although I did buy Bitcoin 2 years ago that I am still in the red on.
     
  16. aadz93

    aadz93 GBAtemp Official Psychonaut
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    this reminds me when i got into stocks because i heard about the detective pikachu movie being made, i remember what the Pokemon go launch did for nintendo, invested 150bucks into nintendo, once they started airing advertisements on tv, my $150 turned into $500 overnight, boy was i happy
     
  17. colemanBro

    colemanBro Newbie
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    Not really. This Covid scared the hell out of me, so I didn't want to risk. Moreover, the platform I used to trade on, is not moneymaking anymore, so I need to figure out what I'm gonna do. I have a close friend that trades on Investous broker and he keeps telling me how good it is. Well, I might give it a try soon, because trading is what I do for a living, so I need options. Have you guys heard about this platform? From the reviews read online it seems to be pretty good, so this is the most important, but let me know your experience.
     
    Last edited by colemanBro, Aug 28, 2020
  18. Silent_Gunner

    Silent_Gunner Crazy Cool Cyclops
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    I have an older brother who's been into it for 10+ years. Even has a book by Cramer himself! But unfortunately, he sold some of his when shit started hitting the fan.

    Personally, my plan has been to get out of the debt hole I'm currently in, build up my personal savings throughout the winter months, hope I don't get into an accident with all of the fucking construction going on with the highways over where I live, and make it to spring and then maybe focus on finding a job somewhere I'd like to live that didn't go full "use-crisis-as-opportunity-to-do-things-you-normally-couldn't" like my state kind of is doing atm (though not to the authoritarian levels as some states like Michigan, California, New York, etc.), get situated and used to living on my own, maybe get a backup car either before or after moving out...

    ...and then, when I finally have peace of mind, I would worry about investing into the stock market. I kind of want to do that before this lockdown comes to an end (and, without saying when, we all know when that's gonna be) in hopes of reaping the gains, but that's gonna depend on how shitty things are looking around here and possibly in the aftermath of the event I'm referring to in the parentheses I really hope I don't have to specify for fear of turning this discussion political...


    I know, a lot to say, "There's a lot of things I want to do first before investing," but I have a tendency to write a stream of consciousness that gets specific out of fear of misinterpretation of what a smaller statement would imply. Sometimes, I feel like I'm

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    My older bro's been doing it for 10 years, and as long as you steer clear of the penny stocks and get-rich-quick schemes, you ain't gambling! :)
     
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  19. leon315

    leon315 POWERLIFTER
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    the stock of major markets are having vertical drop during Lockdown, it's foolish and it's a risky gambling move to invest in stock market.

    Even there will be a comeback after positive vaccine news, one would never predict which direction goes.

    Trust me, moving in stock market is like diving into a sea full of sharks and profit is not worth the high amount of risk, don't buy anything unless your are highly qualified economist/analyst.

    edit: THE ONLY STOCK I BUY is the one from GTAV lul, cauz i can save my game before i buy stock, u guys seems don't have save button in real world.
     
    Last edited by leon315, Aug 28, 2020
  20. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer
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    Please point me at a qualified* trader/economist that beats the market consistently.

    *whatever that might mean -- most of the time the ones I meet they get off the street, put on simulators and baby's first portfolio and go from there. Economists, be they Chicago or Austrian, do wonderful things as well but are usually more about economics than stocks which is a related field -- it is a bit like getting a psychologist to run a mental health clinic, they might understand the terms and practices to an extent but likely have not ever had to inject someone, never mind restrain them.

    Actually during lockdown (started March in most places) the markets were raising, quite considerably at that (percentage wise tens of percent over the course of a few months which is an insane return -- 4-5% per annum being really good work). As in invest even in an index fund during the low point March and sell today you will be quite a bit richer than you would have been, certainly far more than anything in recent memory that is not crypto). Prior to that then yeah they dropped sharply.

    Various US indexes
    https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/index/nya
    Screenshot_2020-08-28_14-04-00.png

    Japan
    https://quote.jpx.co.jp/jpx/templat...&t2=08&t3=27&x1=2020&x2=08&x3=27&term=&type=1
    Screenshot_2020-08-28_14-09-22.png

    Asia
    https://www.wsj.com/market-data/stocks/asia/indexes
    Several of those are even above year to date, can't be bothered to make pictures for all of them though.

    Europe
    https://live.euronext.com/en/product/indices/FR0003502079-XPAR
    Screenshot_2020-08-28_14-13-46.png

    London
    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=f...so=_jwNJX63KOuSl1fAP8Z-_6A01:0&wptab=OVERVIEW
    Screenshot_2020-08-28_14-17-39.png

    Canada
    https://uk.tradingview.com/symbols/TSX-TSX/
    Screenshot_2020-08-28_14-22-40.png

    That is many of the big boys on https://www.valuewalk.com/2019/02/top-10-largest-stock-exchanges/ and certainly the main players in the free world.
     
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