GBAtemp game of the week - #75

Discussion in 'GBAtemp & Scene News' started by FAST6191, Nov 1, 2012.

Nov 1, 2012

GBAtemp game of the week - #75 by FAST6191 at 2:29 PM (1,692 Views / 0 Likes) 4 replies

  1. FAST6191
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    [h2]GBAtemp book game club #75[/h2]

    Kanji Sonomama Rakubiki Jiten (NDS)

    Although the name of the series would appear to be about games today we are going to look at something slightly different. Anybody that has followed the releases of various consoles or scanned through the libraries of titles available will have seen the various "edutainment" titles available as well as those programs aiming to be tools. Beyond that anybody that spends time scanning through the homebrew will often see all sorts of interesting little programs created that are neither games nor emulators. Furthermore, usually upon seeing the various language learning titles and realising that little games like these are fairly good ways to assist learning a language, the question of "is there anything like that, but in English?" gets asked. This title is not so much one of those but an electronic dictionary that goes between Japanese and English pretty well, these devices often cost a small fortune and this program sits up there with some of the better ones. Today mobile phones and tablet type devices do a lot of this sort of thing (with interesting results), but we have to acknowledge those that tried their hand at it on the handhelds and consoles before then.
    Although we are not aiming for quite such a freeform discussion as last edition's DS shmups discussion by all means share your favourite language learning games for the consoles.



    A nice review/tutorial/overview​
    KanjiSonomamaRakubikiJitenDS.jpg

    We are working on getting a new searching mechanism working with the new forum software now our tag system has been changed. In the meantime all the editions are in this section and hopefully GBAGOTW should get you the other entries in the series. gbagotw.

    GBAtemp book game club/GBAtemp game of the week is a feature on GBAtemp that aims to highlight various titles and have the end users discuss the merits of a title (as opposed to the staff or another reviewer). It is designed not a top ? games list and we will usually draw from things the DS can emulate or more commonly the huge libraries of ROM hacks, commercial releases, homebrew code and leaked/beta code available for the GBA, DS and Wii.
     
  2. Densetsu

    Former Staff Densetsu Pubic Ninja

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    I can attest to the usefulness of this game software. It doesn't come close to the functionality of a full-fledged electronic dictionary like the CasioEX-word or the Canon Wordtank Z410, but in a pinch it does quite well. I used it for a couple weeks when I broke my first Canon Wordtank and was waiting until my next payday to buy a new Wordtank.

    Some of my fellow expatriates actually used this software as their primary Japanese dictionary for the entire time they lived in Japan. It worked well for most of them, but it all comes down to your personal preferences. If you're just after a decent dictionary that will do J-E and E-J, it'll suffice. But if you're planning on studying Japanese and increasing your reading fluency, this will fall terribly short.

    A word about the input recognition: I don't know why the guy in the video was having such a hard time inputting the letters, but my experience with the software's recognition wasn't nearly that bad. In the entire time I've used it, I think it only failed to recognize a few characters. It's important to keep in mind that this software was made for Japanese people. They're conditioned from childhood to write kanji in a certain way, so when they learn to write English block letters, that conditioning carries over to their English handwriting. They tend to write their English letters a lot more deliberately than the native English speaker, so their block letters look closer to how they would look in print. So they would probably have far fewer input fails than the guy in the video has. If your handwriting is very stylistic or flowy, it probably won't be picked up very well.

    You obviously need to know how to read hiragana and katakana in order to make good use out of this, but you can learn them all in a weekend or two. It's definitely worth the small time investment to be able to use Rakubiki Jiten. By the way, the title of the software, Kanji Sonomama Rakubiki Jiten literally translates to The Easy, Direct Kanji Lookup Dictionary.

    I could probably answer some specific questions about Rakubiki Jiten if anyone has any. It's been years since I used it, so I might be a little fuzzy on the details, but I'll answer the best I can.

    @FAST6191: Mind if I link this in the Nihongo FAQ? Any serious posts on the 'Temp regarding Japanese learning are scarce, so your post would be a good addition.
     
  3. FAST6191
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    Reporter FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Damn, somehow missed the reply.

    By all means link it wherever you want. I did mean to mention the touchscreen stuff/OCR is better than the video would lead you to believe- OCR for Japanese is a horrifically hard task (especially when going in cold without an idea of the tai/font it started as or indeed handwriting) but it manages admirably.
     
  4. Heran Bago

    Member Heran Bago Where do puyo come from?

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    One of the best pieces of DS software out there. Well worth the buy and far cheaper than a "real" electronic kanji dictionary, albeit more limited.
     
  5. Densetsu

    Former Staff Densetsu Pubic Ninja

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    Thanks, FAST!
     

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