Game Reviewer from the Big Companies

Discussion in 'General Gaming Discussion' started by ponygals, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. ponygals
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    ponygals GBAtemp Regular

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    How can you become a game reviewer and receive free games from gaming companies from Nintendo, Activision, Sony Playstation, XBox, etc. I see a lot of YouTuber's getting free games or other free stuff to review for their channels or websites.

    So how can you go abouts doing the same thing?
     
  2. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Guru

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    Ask Reporter team. Like @Chary :P
     
  3. DinohScene

    DinohScene Dino for Hire

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    1. Become a well known Youtuber or blogger.
    2. Probably be over 18 for it to do it.
    3. Keep producing good content for your site.

    That's probably it...
     
  4. ponygals
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    ponygals GBAtemp Regular

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    well I am pretty known but not as known as others who keep getting stuff from the same companies that I also have worked with, a lot of companies stopped working with me but still work with others all because of the higher numbers.
     
  5. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Guru

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    What companies have you done work for? :)
     
  6. ponygals
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    ponygals GBAtemp Regular

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    A few toy companies but only like once or twice then they stopped talking to me lol.
     
  7. Enigma Hall

    Enigma Hall GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    They dont like the fact you is a flying pony. :v
     
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  8. RevPokemon

    RevPokemon GBATemp's 3rd Favorite Transgirl

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    That is just the way business works but I would say just keep trying to increase your quality and gain more followers.
     
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  9. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Guru

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    Oh i thought you meant like games. Umm well i dunno. You have any videos? :ninja:
     
  10. Joe88

    Joe88 [λ]

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    Its a very overcrowded field to try and break into, since alot of people saw it as a get rich from playing games and making fake reactions.
     
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  11. endoverend

    endoverend AKA zooksman

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    I'm sure it's much harder than you think :/
     
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  12. Chary

    Chary Never sleeps

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    How do you become a game reviewer? Well, I suppose if you have experience in writing, you want to just look for any publication that's hiring and make yourself known. If you want to make it on your own, just write, write, write. Start a blog and write articles and reviews of games in hopes that you get noticed. It's a pretty tough barrier to break into though. Like @Joe88 mentioned, YouTube reviews and "let's players" are very very common. And only a small few of them actually get sponsorship deals from companies. Writing on the other hand, requires a lot of dedication to deadlines and having a love for all things video games. I've learned that it's not about getting the games for free, it's also about helping consumers make good, informed choices. You have to love not only video games, but writing about them too, and trying to give each game a fair shot with as little bias as possible. Sorry for the quickly put together explanation, hope it helps a little.

    Tldr you need a platform to write from first, then you need lots of viewers, then you get the free stuffs from reaching out to companies
     
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  13. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    I think all had been said, but I'll add my 2 centre on anyway...

    Reviewing is the easy part. Just get some stream games and write reviews for them. Easy...
    Making YouTube videos isn't that much harder technically (though might be more expensive depending on how much you want to put into it), but it's more about the personality. Can you captivate the interest of a large group?

    However, you come over as if the reviewing is only there to get free stuff, which... Is pretty weird if you ask me. Talking about the game should be the obvious passion; it's also what attracts viewers (do you often watch channels from people who are just doing it because it gets them games?).

    It's also worth thinking from the developer's perspective: why would anyone give you a free copy, when there are plenty of people doing it for free?
    This isn't a question to bash you, but to get a point across: what do you have to offer that others don't? Why would people watch your stream over others?

    So...let's say you review about half your gaming library, have a good knack on things and a loyal audience of thousands. That still isn't warrantying getting free stuff. If you show too much, they won't do it because spoiling everything means your audience won't buy the game themselves. Sucking at the game isn't good as your audience will think it's too hard. Being negative isn't what will get you rewards, but sucking up because you got things at a discount might lose you subscribers. And so on. What I'm saying is: there won't be a clear cut answer either way.
     
    Last edited by Taleweaver, Nov 30, 2016
  14. T-hug

    T-hug Always like this.

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    If you submit a review we'll take a look we are always looking for new people to join the team.
     
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  15. Flame

    Flame Me > You

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    its with getting a good rep about writing about the different layers of gaming in a complex manner were anyone could understand and doing this one after another.





    or you could get lucky and write pieces were you give a game 7.8/10 and say too much water and get the game for free.
     
    Last edited by Flame, Nov 30, 2016
  16. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Guru

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    I wanna add some cents to this, but i only have dimes so whatever. :creep:

    So umm serious questions, do game companies actually only do business with people who are willing to sell out? I mean logically speaking you partner with someone who is meant to help boost popularity, so if you sponser with someone who sends you a bad game you honestly didn't like and review it with poor score and reasoning, would that be like "Drop this person since they aren't liking my stuff" kind of thing?

    I mean i want to know since I'm sure there is people out there who do collusions, illumanati plotting stuff like that and i prefer honest opinions over fraudulent ones cause i want to spend my money on stuff that is worth it. Of course ultimately i make that decision but if i do look for new stuff i want to be open to suggestions, is hard to trust some people. :unsure:

    I don't know if anyone understands what i am saying but basically i just want to know if i do find reviews how do i know it can be trusted that the review is the writer's honest opinion and not just promotional publicity for greed on the grounds that it helps business.:mellow:
     
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  17. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    It is a point of some concern within the game and review... industry. It gets worse when they are the same people buying advertising on your site, especially when that might be the main source of revenue. On the flip side promises of some kind of renumeration for overly positive reviews/certain scores is kind of risky for everybody, should such a thing come to light or turn around and be exposed then it ends badly.
    I am sure there are some PR firms and publishers that pull certain titles, might skip certain reviewers and the like to attempt to boost things. Being as it is games though then many people can afford to buy things outright where reviewing say cars is notably harder, even something like tools can be fun if you have to drop $500 on something that does essentially the same as something you already have ( https://www.festoolusa.com/power-to.../t-183-lithium-ion-cordless-drill-plus-564574 ).

    If you are willing to sell yourself out for the price of a game you likely can not resell plus the hours needed to produce a review then you have bigger problems. Equally people can generally detect such things fairly quickly -- you say a game has no bugs and good gameplay and it is readily apparent if someone plays it. To that end wait two weeks, or two months. Bonus is the game will probably have dropped in price by then.

    But to answer the question it does help if you can play it in some manner. I am not sure what goes for game rental these days but back when it was a useful thing, if a friend is buying something sight unseen then that also works. Read multiple reviews is also a thing, even better if you can find multiple reviewers that have similar likes to you (may be easier said than done in your case if previous conversations are anything to go by).
    You could learn to detect lies in text, it is harder in some ways than doing it in person but by no means impossible. Most people doing things here are more looking for people that claim to have used a service and did not but that is not the problem for games so much, though if you did want to learn to detect that then one of the bigger indicators is the person leaving the fake review will tend to say "I" a lot more than non fakes to try to convince you and themselves they were there. More on that https://www.tnooz.com/article/fake-review-optimization-how-black-hat-masters-beat-the-travel-system/
    Omissions are probably the main tool for the dodgy game, book or film reviewer, talk up some other aspect and play do or entirely neglect to mention a given part of a game being the big ones, however that could be reviewer style; I don't care about online multiplayer and usually have to force myself to check out the section to see if the network code, and any balancing if it is a competitive game, is any good for things I do. An omission could also be an oversight or the mark of a lesser reviewer* in some regards, I don't like checkbox reviews and for many things you might only notice it if it is broken -- think about bad controls in a game, how often do you notice if they are perfectly functional vs actually being bad?

    *a hard thing as some of this is something you might only notice if you know to look for it. An example I often find people respond well to

    A bad opening is hardly ideal and almost certainly would not break a game like Skyrim which has an entire other aspect to draw people in, but is is something not many would know how to articulate, and may just have been left feeling a bit underwhelmed. Alternatively if you did mainly just want an epic quest about dragon slaying it might be a sign of poor things to come.
    This cuts the other way as well. Tribes 2 is probably the best earlier example of such things but it is probably too old at this point so I would instead look at something like DOTA/MOBA games. Companies asked what people want and they responded with a list of mechanics like last hitting (if you are the one to destroy something, even if it is your own, the person that might have done all the work is denied the very useful experience) which is bizarre to me, see also the phrase inmates running the asylum. Or more common is have you ever seen things banned from competition, only to come back in when the game remains unchanged but someone discovers something is not overpowered after all as it has weaknesses and counter play styles?
     
  18. ponygals
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    ponygals GBAtemp Regular

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    Oh I see.