Emulation, game quality, and the value of "intended play"

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Lately I’ve found myself in the likely common position of emulating The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild via Cemu. In truth, I’d thought to revisit the game by playing it on Switch as I had when it released, but despite having put over 300 hours into the game in total around the time of its launch, I just couldn’t get back into it. Having been playing so many PC games in the meanwhile, most with unlocked framerates, the controls of BotW felt less responsive and the framerate more painful than back once upon a starry-eyed launch. I was disappointed when, for 3 days, every time I found myself bored and I sat down to play, I felt the need to turn the game off before I’d even spent half an hour. It was a let-down, sure, but I thought that maybe some games need the novelty of a brand new world and undiscovered mechanics to carry you through the less pleasant aspects of the game, and I was prepared to accept that. On a lark, hoping to find at least some modest engagement in the act of emulation, I tried booting the game up on Cemu in one last gambit for entertainment. Over the course of three days, I was startled to find that I’d somehow put 20 hours into a new file.

Zelda games have always been some of the highest-profile titles on each Nintendo system onto which they’re released. Breath of the Wild was both the Wii U’s swansong as well as one of the most highly praised Zeldas to come out in… good lord, it’s been almost a decade since Skyward Sword. Does that game count as “highly praised”? Well, with Zelda being the uber franchise that it is, it’s no surprise that a Wii U emulator would focus so much on compatibility with BotW, and focus it certainly has. Through the use of community graphics packs, Cemu gives BotW; an extremely comprehensive list of all kinds of odd internal rendering resolutions, the ability to adjust level of detail bias, a toggle for depth of field, enhanced reflections, settings for shadow resolutions (up to 400% base resolutions), and many more aesthetic tweaks. For myself, though, the big cake underneath the delicious icing is the ability to blast that framerate beyond 30fps, beyond 60, even beyond 120, and up to 165fps. I’d have loved a 240fps option, but I have to be frank with myself, my PC would never hit those numbers.

I’m entirely CPU bottlenecked with my RTX 2070 and an i7-4790k, but even on my rig I can maintain 60+ fps @1920x1080 in the open world, and by the sweet sweat of Satan, it both feels and looks like a dream. This is to say nothing of the framerate inside shrines, which is consistently above 120fps, where much less needs to be rendered. At 60fps, actions like sweeping the camera to admire the sprawling landscape, or keeping track of enemy movements to time a parry no longer give me the eye strain it used to on the Switch, and the reduced input latency means that I’m taking less damage as a result of my directions not registering quickly enough. It really is indescribable how it feels to play the game on PC at 120fps as compared to 30, to watch things glide across the screen, and I imagine it’s only something I can show rather than tell. More impressive is how this is all accomplished while also enhancing the quality of the visual assets, as high quality textures can be loaded at extreme distances, the boosted resolution gives everything new clarity, and reflection tweaks give wet or metallic objects a gorgeous, realistic sheen in a sunrise. Combined with the higher resolution, these make the rolling hills of Hyrule look so much more alive, and the act of standing atop a tower becomes more of a marvel than it was on console.

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Even if your PC can't hit framerates of 60fps and a high resolution, so long as your GPU has the VRAM, you can produce a significantly cleaner look via Cemu's ability to force high quality textures to load at a much higher draw distance. For just a single option, I'm surprised it could go on to affect the landscape so drastically. The difference between the Switch and Wii U is certainly visible, but that boost is dwarfed when going to PC.
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Comparison pic provided by user "Abdulrahman" on Resetera.

Interestingly, there are a few unintentional side-effects of the framerate which also end up enhancing the experience in subtle ways, one of which being that the game’s menus don’t exactly know how to deal with the sped up framerate, and as a result they themselves begin running more quickly. This “glitch” actually makes menu management so much less painful by speeding up the act of sorting through items, putting them in your hands for cooking, eating multiples of the same item, and swapping weapons via the d-pad. So many management actions are made less intrusive, and I’m no longer so reticent to swap weapons mid-combat, making what once broke the flow of gameplay now more integrated into it. As a result, I was finding myself less exasperated on average during casual play. It hadn't really occurred to me just how clunky the original game’s menu system was until the problem was accidentally rectified. The game’s input latency is also reduced significantly by the higher framerate and ability to disable v-sync, making techs like bomb impact launches (or “boomy zoomies”, if you prefer the scientific term) much more consistent to perform, though even the most uncomplicated actions like running and jumping are improved by the lowered latency. Granted, not all glitches introduced by the higher framerate are positive, as the physics of some objects tend to break, especially in regards to gravity/buoyancy. Hanging ropes holding lanterns or platforms jiggle continually, items in water behave strangely if thrown from high up by continually bobbing deep into and high out of water, and loosing a chest from dirt using magnesis causes it to rocket much too high into the sky, only falling many seconds later. They don’t impede puzzle-solving, at least as much as I’ve experienced, so I find them more amusing than anything, but it’s still clearly not how objects were intended to interact. It’s a mixed bag, but for me, the benefits outweigh the negatives by many times.

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Now, it’s no secret that companies like Nintendo aren’t exactly fond of the option of emulation being available to the consumer, and understandably so. Competent, accessible console emulation does inherently more easily facilitate software piracy as an alternative to buying games/consoles, even though that very much isn’t the intended effect. Indeed, most high-profile emulators like Cemu specifically and emphatically do not condone the act of piracy, and are more concerned with the act of games preservation. Even still, emulation sits in somewhat of a gray area when it comes to the games industry, not at all illegal (given no copyright is being infringed, code stolen, etc.) but still on the moral/legal fringe. In many circles, emulation is seen as a de-facto less legitimate method of play than official hardware, with some more extreme groups decrying it as nothing but a piracy enabler. That being said, I just can’t deny that what emulation does in service of preservation and accessibility long-term is necessary for games as an artform, despite, though not to minimize, whatever hypothetical damage it might or might not enable to the immediate industry.

What I’ve come to understand more clearly in my time using Cemu, however, is how the act of emulation can actually provide what I consider to be a more “pure” experience for games than even the hardware they were on which they were originally published can provide. In my own case, because of emulation, I was able to engage with a form of Breath of the Wild which I found much more entertaining than it was at launch, and that was solely due to the enhancements provided by said emulation. I’ve seen it repeated often that emulators should do nothing more than provide an experience which endeavors to exactly mimic that of the original hardware, with no exceptions, with anything enabling otherwise being called a detriment to gaming as a whole. There’s a question someone posted in 2013 regarding a mod to potentially increase the framerate of Ocarina of Time from 20fps (NTSC) to 30, or even 60, to which one user replied saying that people who request and utilize emulation-based enhancements are a detriment to "proper" emulation.
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Similarly, in 2019, a small debate regarding how much responsibility an emulator should have with representing the exact state in which a game originally played spawning as a result of the popular SNES emulator, bsnes, allowing for the removal of console slowdown in some games, with many similar arguments made against the feature. From the perspective purely of preservation, I can immediately see why retaining artifacts of the limitations of a console during emulation is extremely important. For example, there currently exists a 60fps mod for Super Mario 64, which is a game I certainly wouldn’t bring myself to play at any other framerate, but while it’s the only viable way for me to personally enjoy the game, I recognize that it’s important that this doesn’t somehow become the only way for people to play it, despite the fact that I regard it as an objective upgrade. Reviews of the game from back in 1996 can be readily dug up online detailing the thoughts people had on the game at the time they were thinking them, but while these contain mostly subjective assessments and takes on the game reflective of the ideals of the gaming community at the time, emulation gives us a unique method of experiencing the game as it existed in the past; a past which could easily be skewed with misinformation.

What if, hypothetically, the 60fps version of SM64 were the only version in circulation? How many decades would it be until the information regarding how the game originally played was lost? Can’t you just picture some edgy 10-year-olds, 50 years from now, saying things like “gosh, games were so much better back in the old days” based off a flawed understanding of the originals due to enhancements in emulation? I mean, if microtransactions become the future then they’d still be right, but I digress. This is something we’ve empirically seen in regards to many things in history, where the negative gets forgotten and the positive gets idealized. For something as quantifiable as the framerate, it’s easy to imagine that that information could be preserved via text alone, but it’s one thing to imagine the game playing at 30fps, and another to understand how it felt. Moreover, what about those aspects less quantifiable? Nobody has, or will ever, document every single position Mario can stand in, or every direction the camera can look in which causes framedrops, or the exact severity of the drops. If emulation doesn’t allow you to preserve those dips in framerate accurately, then in an eventuality where emulation is the only means by which one can access these games (already a truth for a great many games presently), the zeitgeist’s idea of the original experience will have already, if subtly, differed from the reality. These perceptions are important, as they’re frequently drawn upon for contemporary comparisons and discussions, and it affects what we think we understand of the past.

I understand how fragile this situation can be, as I’ve already experienced the phenomenon personally. Having never owned a Super Nintendo as a child, my introduction to the gems of the SNES was via emulation, somewhere around the mid-late 2000s. As I played the seminal classics via the emulators of the time, I found myself not having very much fun at all, and stopped before I even got halfway through any game. I kinda hated the experience, thinking that the games felt extremely clunky and hard to control, which I assumed was because of their age. After all, these games had come out so many years before, and it seemed reasonable to expect some rough patches and growing pains before game developers mastered the minutiae of how games should control. My experience playing an NES emulator made for similar results, and it only solidified this idea for me. What I had yet to understand until much later, as I played a real SNES on a CRT, was that the clunkiness I had just assumed was a product of the games’ ages was actually the input latency brought on by emulation, and had nothing to do with the games at all. In this way, in a microcosm, I had been unintentionally mislead as to the nature of those old games just because of mildly inaccurate emulation. It left an impression of just how easily anyone's perception of the past can be skewed, with no notice or warning. In the near future, there’ll be a generation who will have never played a real N64. Heck, I’m sure there’s already a generation that has no access to a SNES or NES, and whose only experiences of those games have come from emulation, whether official or otherwise. Were it not for Retroarch’s “runahead” feature bringing input latency in line with console hardware (amusingly something which could be called an “enhancement” depending on who you ask), many others would likely have come to the same erroneous conclusions as I did. For those who have only played these retro games via Nintendo’s own, more laggy emulation, their perspectives on these old titles are almost certainly at least somewhat perverted as well, and I imagine they’re likely more disposed to be critical of these older games in discussions than they would be otherwise, just as I was.

It’s definitely important for historical accuracy, then, that once most consumer N64s have ceased to work, we don’t look back upon landmark titles like Super Mario 64 through a 1080p 60fps lens. The critical acclaim that game received upon launch takes on a very different context when you can play the game at its native resolution of 320x240, with a framerate cap of 30fps which frequently dipped into 20fps. I’m not trying to slag the original release of Super Mario 64, mind you, only to point out that just how beloved this game was in its time gives insight into the standards, expectations, and desires of the gaming community as a whole during the late 90s. Without a way to preserve all its jaggies, all its slowdowns, all its original input lag, we lose key information necessary to understand the industry and the consumers at the time. With 1:1 console emulation, or at least as accurate as we can get, we attempt to achieve a unique tool by which we can essentially go back in time to see and feel exactly what caused such a sensation to the best of our abilities, instead of being limited to inference via text descriptions. For perspective, cultural and art historians would kill to have access to a machine which could accurately reproduce the works of Michelangelo, or the plays of Shakespeare, exactly as they were seen in their time, and for good reason. Emulation is that tool for gaming.

That being said, the mere existence of this 60fps SM64 mod alone is not capable of compromising historical preservation, as some would imply, in the same way that a digital edit of Van Gogh’s Starry Night doesn’t change the original. So long as the original experience is maintained/labeled as the original and made readily accessible, then we’ll keep our metaphorical time-machine to see things through the eyes of the consumers of the past. In fact, by completely denying the enhancements that emulators provide, we would strip them of, what is in my strong opinion, one of their most powerful abilities: the means to give us better, more accessible versions of games which we wouldn’t get otherwise.

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Though “improved” is not how many would describe the emulation of these games. A common argument I’ve repeatedly seen against not only the personal implementation of these enhancements, but their existence in general, is that “the games were not intended to be played at higher than 30fps” or “this game was designed around the input lag”. Among others, my biggest issue with these arguments is that they show a critical misunderstanding of the concept of developer intentions. Breath of the Wild was “intended” to be played at 30fps, only insofar as the team made the decision to release it knowing the framerate at which it ran. Yes, the designers deliberately published the game with the understanding that consumers will be playing it at 30fps, but what the argument fails to understand is that this does not mean they would have preferred it to be 30fps, only that it ended up this way. BotW’s designers didn’t implement a 30fps cap because it made the game feel/look the best it could; it was a compromise of hardware with respect to the kind of game they wanted to make. An open world with wide areas full of weather effects, enemies, and many distant objects takes quite a bit of processing, after all, and if the choice was between their entire artistic vision for the gameplay and maintaining 60fps, they naturally prioritized the former. The game has certainly not been made more enjoyable by way of having higher input latency, or by making it more difficult to interpolate and react to objects in motion, or (if you’re like me) giving the player a headache as they try to focus their eyes on 30fps; these were necessities to make it run on the Switch in the form that they wanted. Similarly, the development staff making Ocarina of Time didn’t make the gameplay 20fps purely as a means to facilitate their artistic vision or enhance the player’s experience, it was in order to maintain a relatively high polygon count on screen without the N64 catching fire. Super Mario 64 doesn’t swap out Mario’s default model for a low-poly one when the screen zooms out because the developers thought it looked cool, it was so that they could try their best to maintain the framerate while more and more objects come on screen. These are not elements that serve the game’s or the developers’ intentions, they’re strategic compromises in order to make the best game they can.

This is actually why I see these enhancements, like those I’m using in Breath of the Wild, as a more accurate representation of the experience that the developers would have wanted to provide by circumventing the technical limitations of the hardware. For Breath of the Wild, lowering input latency, making the game run at as high a framerate as your machine can handle, and loading high-quality textures at longer distances serve to remove some of the barriers to immersion that the hardware brought on, making for a game which better achieves the core feelings the developers wanted to evoke. Of course, it’s always important that these enhancements are opt-in, so as not to breed the misunderstanding that the game always ran this way.

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In this way, emulators have become not just a powerful tool for artistic conservation, but also a means to give us better, more accessible versions of the games we currently play. Many games have had elements compromised by the hardware to which they’re beholden, and emulation has evolved with the ability to remove those barriers. Due to console exclusivity, we will almost certainly never get a PC version of Breath of the Wild, but this also means that the game will never be as fun as it could be, or feel as good as it could feel, or look as gorgeous as it might on PC. Experiencing the impact of Cemu’s enhancements has already proven that much to me. I mean, if just a few user enhancements could change the game so much, imagine what an official port with a budget would look like. Emulation can serve as a means to not only show us just how much games can be held back by the concept of artificial exclusivity, but also just how the final quality would have been affected had certain design elements been changed. After all, it’s one thing to guess that a game would have been better if it had less input lag, a higher framerate, a higher resolution, less motion blur, etc., but it’s entirely more useful to see as much empirically, and be able to draw conclusions via observation rather than supposition. Emulation’s enhancements serve to clear up the ambiguity in these kinds of arguments, which are important as a means to give critical feedback and influence how games evolve.

So it's by emulating Zelda on Cemu that I've come to realize how much of a difference emulation can make in gaming. It’s become evident to me, at least, that the conversation should focus less on whether or not emulators should provide enhancements to the games they emulate, and instead on methods by which we can maintain both hardware-accurate emulation and playability enhancements in tandem. Emulation is both the gateway to experiencing the enhanced PC ports of games that we would have never been able to play otherwise, while also a way to preserve the history of gaming in a form which is readily accessible to anyone willing to spend a few minutes. This accessibility is a critical point, mind, as just having original games preserved in a museum somewhere drastically limits the amount of people who will be able to personally educate themselves with it. These two functions are not mutually exclusive, both serve critical roles in today's and the future's gaming cultures, and should both be actively pursued if we want to make the most out of our tools.
 
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64bitmodels

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Yeah, no thank you. The Wind Waker's Great Sea seems to be mostly empty, but there's always some new ring of light to haul up to get 50 Rupees, or an objective to head towards. That's a far superior "open world", and it was first released on the GameCube! Not to mention how it lacks those unnecessary open-world hindrances in fragility and stamina and temperature.
Go play The Wind Waker instead; it's unfathomably better than Breath of the Wild.
yes because being forced to change the wind in order to go where you want to go and having to look at a repeated image of a fucking sea is so much better than climbing and exploring a vast open world with so many quests and NPCs to talk to. Also there's enemies to fight. don't see any of that on wind waker...
in wind waker you have to do the triforce quest, which in of itself makes BOTW better, even on wii u with the better triforce placement.
i'd rather deal with temperature, stamina and durability than look at a boring landscape over 1 million times with nothing to do in it other than sail, and sail, and fucking sail to specific places that you won't even know you're supposed to go to unless you look up a walkthrough, which is already flawed game design.
At least with BOTW the game points you where you're supposed to go. how you're supposed to get there isn't shared though, so it isn't considered hand holding.
But with triforce quest, you have to find all these fucking triforce charts and shit just to find one fucking piece in your grand adventure. and the fact it's at the end is one of the reasons it makes it hard to replay WW.
I like wind waker, but that shit can go die.
 
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Kurt91

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When I was little, I was subscribed to a handful of the different gaming magazines at the time. Stuff like "Nintendo Power", "GamePro", and "EGM". Back then, one of the games that really interested me was "Castlevania 64". From what I'd seen about it in the walkthroughs and stuff, it looked really fascinating, and I really wanted to see what it was like for myself. When I saw the actual reviews and the scores, I remember reading that the game wasn't very good, and the controls in particular were absolutely terrible.

Fast forward 20+ years later, I remembered the game and decided that I'd give it a try via emulator to see what I thought. Would I enjoy the game like my younger self thought I would, or would I agree with the general public and have a miserable time. I fired up an emulator to play it, and pulled up GameFAQs so I could see what the controls were, and figure out how best to map it to a 360 controller.

Holy Crap! These controls made absolutely no sense to anybody who had ever held a Nintendo 64 controller. Use the Control Stick to move, but the Control Pad to move the camera?! You either were incredibly double-jointed and could move your hands in remarkable ways, or you had to completely release the hand controlling the character to grab the other handle and spin the camera. In close quarters with something behind you, you were completely screwed!

So, I remapped the controls to something that made sense. Of course, the camera control went to the right analog stick, and the general controls were turned into a fusion of Ocarina of Time 3D and Kingdom Hearts. You know what? The game was actually really fun! I played the "Legacy of Darkness" version of the game, admittedly, so I can't say about the original version's level design, but the game that I played had pretty good level design, and I had a ton of fun playing through the whole thing. I honestly think that the original game's controls were so bad that people reviewing the game were already put in a bad mood and took it out on the rest of the game.

So yeah, I think that emulation can bring out the best qualities of a game. The game I played was supposedly terrible on original hardware, but was a lot of fun to play when I had modern resources and adapted it to modern sensibilities. I can completely understand enjoying a game more when using an emulator as compared to the original hardware. Honestly, I think that in situations like BotW, Cemu and Yuzu could easily just be considered third and fourth versions of the game and compared side-by-side with the original.

I will say this, though. As much as a game can be improved with all of the extra settings and features on an emulator, there's still nothing quite like having the original console and setting it up on an old-school television. Honestly, I've wanted to find computer scans of the old magazines and player's guides from back then and print them out, just so I can have an old-school play session like I did when I was little. I remember spending hours playing "Super Mario RPG" or "Star Fox 64" with the respective player's guides, making sure I didn't miss a thing for the former, and pouring into all of the supplementary information for each planet in the latter.
 

raxadian

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It can't be helped, even with all the updates and patches in the Switch version, Breath Of the Wild was originally made as a Wii U game.

Compare to Super Mario Oddisey that was directly made for the Switch.

Also early games for a videogame console usually are not the best they can be, more so if they are ports.
 
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AkiraKurusu

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It can't be helped, even with all the updates and patches in the Switch version, Breath Of the Wild was originally made as a Wii U game.

Compare to Super Mario Oddisey that was directly made for the Switch.

Also early games for a videogame console usually are not the best they can be, more so if they are ports.
Super Mario Odyssey's a great game, for what it is; I do find collecting most of the Moons enjoyable, the Cappy mechanics provide a lot of depth (even if I'm just in the shallows with floaties on, metaphorically speaking), and the various Kingdoms visited are all unique and interesting.

HOWEVER. There are several Moons I cannot stand, such as volleyball, skip rope, "Walking on the Moon!" (walking in a circle), the Breakdown Road Moons, Koopa races, and others. While these are very few in number compared to the enjoyable Moons, they are still extremely noticeable blemishes that should not exist. Furthermore, being limited to 3 HP outside of Assist Mode (6 with that temporary HP doubling item) is nonsense when three previous games gave Mario a solid 8 HP at all times; I hate how this inane nerf has persisted since the garbage known as Super Mario Galaxy. While I'm glad there's at least one semi-efficient Coin grinding spot, it still takes far too long to get enough gold to buy all the outfits and enough Moons to reach the 999 limit; this needs to be sped up, by keeping the plant grown at all times afterwards (instead of having to carry the nut back to the pot each time), by dropping Mario right next to the stalk, and by awarding a lot more Coins with each go.

Super Mario Odyssey is a great game, but not one I'm particularly eager to revisit - unlike my favourite 3D Mario game, Super Mario 64 DS, which features zero frustrating Stars, multiple characters, and the aforementioned 8 HP, alongside actual power-ups (temporary, but still power-ups).
 
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D34DL1N3R

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No it means you are 48 arguing with a kid over a video game

If you feel that was arguing.... lmao. I'll have to question how many arguments you have ever been in. I'm 48, I know when I am arguing with someone and when I am not. Telling someone the way shit is, is not an argument. Okay bud? But even if I was, because I'm 48 I am not supposed to voice my own thoughts when someone comes at me with some complete bullshit? Want to know what your post means? It means you're a smart-ass, regardless of your age. Shrug. No argument because that would take two & I'm out. Buh-bye now.:)
 
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geodeath

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This whole conversation against emulation to make something better is moot. Nintendo themselves will deliver BOTW: 4K edition in their next or next next or next next next system, simple because people will want to play it again, much like they did already with other zeldas. Just think that you are playing the game in a 'Switch Pro' whatever that might be if and when it comes out, lol.

If i was going to play it again, i would prefer to play it with improvements of course, especially when you play the game on the big screen, some of the models/textures make you feel like you are playing a dreamcast game. (which is to be expected, given the scale of the game - they need to optimise where they can).
 

raxadian

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Super Mario Odyssey's a great game, for what it is; I do find collecting most of the Moons enjoyable, the Cappy mechanics provide a lot of depth (even if I'm just in the shallows with floaties on, metaphorically speaking), and the various Kingdoms visited are all unique and interesting.

HOWEVER. There are several Moons I cannot stand, such as volleyball, skip rope, "Walking on the Moon!" (walking in a circle), the Breakdown Road Moons, Koopa races, and others. While these are very few in number compared to the enjoyable Moons, they are still extremely noticeable blemishes that should not exist. Furthermore, being limited to 3 HP outside of Assist Mode (6 with that temporary HP doubling item) is nonsense when three previous games gave Mario a solid 8 HP at all times; I hate how this inane nerf has persisted since the garbage known as Super Mario Galaxy. While I'm glad there's at least one semi-efficient Coin grinding spot, it still takes far too long to get enough gold to buy all the outfits and enough Moons to reach the 999 limit; this needs to be sped up, by keeping the plant grown at all times afterwards (instead of having to carry the nut back to the pot each time), by dropping Mario right next to the stalk, and by awarding a lot more Coins with each go.

Super Mario Odyssey is a great game, but not one I'm particularly eager to revisit - unlike my favourite 3D Mario game, Super Mario 64 DS, which features zero frustrating Stars, multiple characters, and the aforementioned 8 HP, alongside actual power-ups (temporary, but still power-ups).

You can beat the game without getting all the moons. In fact once you beat Bowser and get the first ending you can just buy all the moons you want.

The hard to get moons are mostly to show off.

Is hard to make a game that's for everyone but Super Mario Odyssey's comes close.

Unlike Sonic Forces that's so easy that even I can get S ranks on it.

Edit: If you go online and update the game you can play the Luigi minigane online that makes farming coins really easy.

Also the Double HP item is really really easy to get, I ended finding it half the time on my first playthrough.
 
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AkiraKurusu

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If i was going to play it again, i would prefer to play it with improvements of course
...Such as completely removing the unnecessary stamina and fragility systems, making resources easier to gather, and making actual combat faster and more engaging like it was in Twilight Princess.

Can't exactly improve on the countless identical shrines (except by changing the wallpaper of every set of five, or something) or the empty plains (except by adding more content) or the slow climbing speed (except by speeding it up) or how rain causes Link to slip and fall (except by making rain not last as long, and/or increasing Link's resistance to slipping), though. Or how there's fewer actual items than actual Legend of Zelda games - no Hookshot, no different-effect Boots, no Hammer, no Hawkeye, no Magic Rod, no Cane of Somaria, no Dash Boots - which means fewer interesting puzzles.
 
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raxadian

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N64 emulation rarely ever looks correct. Nintendo themselves has fudged details like heart containers shimmering.

Don't worry we are less that a decade away from gaming PC hardware to be powerful enough to fully emulate the Nintendo 64 hardware. Once that happens we will have a really good emulator.

Until that happens. you can just use an unofficial addon to run roms on a real N64.
 

AkiraKurusu

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You can beat the game without getting all the moons. In fact once you beat Bowser and get the first ending you can just buy all the moons you want.

The hard to get moons are mostly to show off.

Is hard to make a game that's for everyone but Super Mario Odyssey's comes close.

Unlike Sonic Forces that's so easy that even I can get S ranks on it.

Edit: If you go online and update the game you can play the Luigi minigane online that makes farming coins really easy.

Also the Double HP item is really really easy to get, I ended finding it half the time on my first playthrough.
You can buy the HP-doubler in stores, but it's how Mario's restricted to only 6 HP in normal mode, and how the superior 9 HP in Assist Mode only lasts until you go to 6 or lower, instead of having a permanent 8 HP, that's my issue.

Also, Luigi's Balloon World. Don't care; a lot of balloons are "hidden" in areas I wouldn't have any clue how to reach, due to those jackasses using glitches (e.g. inside of buildings) or highly-advanced Cappy jumps to make them practically impossible to get.

As for "you can beat the game without getting all the Moons", Super Mario 64 DS only requires 70 out of 150 Stars to finish, yet it's still easy and fun to get all 150 regardless. Ergo, it should be easy and fun to get all the non-purchasable Moons, but it's not. That's a definite flaw compared to the DS classic.
 

Ev1l0rd

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...Such as completely removing the unnecessary stamina and fragility systems, making resources easier to gather, and making actual combat faster and more engaging like it was in Twilight Princess.
The fragility and resource system is mostly an early-game issue.

The problem is that the game does a really piss poor job at actually communicating how fragility works and how to engage with it. Basically, the way the game is set up is that there is a hidden "difficulty counter". Enemies all internally are worth a certain amount of points. Defeat an enemy, and the difficulty counter goes up by the amount of points they are worth.

The higher the difficulty counter, the more the game starts to replace weapons in the field with better variants. Rusted swords get replaced with Knight's swords, Knight's swords get replaced with Royal swords and so on and so forth. There are guaranteed spawn locations for pretty much every weapon in the game, so nothing ever really becomes unobtainable thanks to the blood moon (the only difficult ones are the Lynels, which are bugged and need to be save/reloaded to get them). The same counter is also used to bump up enemies, starting from red to blue to black to silver from the top of my head. Again, for every monster there is also a guaranteed spawn location so nothing in the Hyrule Compendium ever truly becomes inaccessible to the player.

Stronger weapons also have higher durability, so if you use a stronger weapon against mostly weak monsters, the total point increase for better variants should still average out at around equal so you'll start finding stronger weapons as well.

This is a pretty smart system, but pretty much all of it is never told to the player. Instead what is taught to the player is "weapons break if I use them. Therefore, I should save up strong weapons rather than use them." It's the same catch-22 that is inherent to Elixirs in the early Final Fantasy, even though this game does actually properly have the systems in place to manage it.
 

Spider_Man

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Where is a dislike button?
Why dislike.

Ohh fanboys get upset, scroll on, keep on walking.

Tbf this is the shittest zelda game ive ever played, usually a fan, but this was a piss poor excuse of a zelda game.

It simply failed to try be an open world adventure game, completely lacked anything story driven, just run aimlessly doing repetitive shrines.

Enemy AI flawed as fuck, certain enemies near impossible to kill, yet gannon the final big bad boss is a piece of piss.

And to think, this is the zelda game we get considering the wii u didnt get anything new until this pile of shit at its end.

I got that bored of the game i ended up rushing, killed Gannon and never returned and will be a typical Nintendo title that has 0 replay value to me and ends up collecting dust, just like the console.
 
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raxadian

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You can buy the HP-doubler in stores, but it's how Mario's restricted to only 6 HP in normal mode, and how the superior 9 HP in Assist Mode only lasts until you go to 6 or lower, instead of having a permanent 8 HP, that's my issue.

Also, Luigi's Balloon World. Don't care; a lot of balloons are "hidden" in areas I wouldn't have any clue how to reach, due to those jackasses using glitches (e.g. inside of buildings) or highly-advanced Cappy jumps to make them practically impossible to get.

As for "you can beat the game without getting all the Moons", Super Mario 64 DS only requires 70 out of 150 Stars to finish, yet it's still easy and fun to get all 150 regardless. Ergo, it should be easy and fun to get all the non-purchasable Moons, but it's not. That's a definite flaw compared to the DS classic.

Your main complain seems to be "The game is not easy enough".

Then go to play a Kirby game then.
 
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AkiraKurusu

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