1. Sonic Angel Knight

    OP Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Legend
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    Sorry but that was funny, no offense to you. Someone saying that is just silly. Not sure what youtube videos you be watching. :P

    But yeah, that is fair. Assuming game devs think we are smart enough to complete the game, expecting us to use our heads, some some take it too far out of reach when it makes us look stupid. For example the P.T. game that people played, not sure if kojima went too far with the puzzle or the youtube videos exaggerated it. Games could have a healthy balance of giving enough information not to confuse or lose player interest and having the player think for themself.

    To the two people writing "SUBJECTIVE" Yes i know it is, i mentioned it already.
    What I want to know is YOUR opinion. :mellow:
     
  2. vinstage

    vinstage sweg
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    This honestly withers down to ones opinion.

    I think the fact Local is still an option is pretty good, so we still have the best of both worlds despite one being heavily used.
     
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  3. It mostly ruined. You don't have friends coming over anymore to play by your side, you don't have those stupid but funny chats and doing this all through online gaming just isn't the same.

    Admittedly, it's still cool to voice-chat with strangers but yeah.
     
  4. Kigiru

    Kigiru GBAtemp Regular
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    I find that social groups based around a concrete game can be sad and rather toxic. Lately i was playing Hearthstone for fun and because i like card games. It was fun, i liked it despite being F2P player and being unable to get most "pro" cards.

    ...and then i discovered their official forums... and biggest unofficial community... and saw how stupid and toxic and retarded people can be. Gaming is fun when it's based around small, friendly communities. Socialization and creating big groups of various people tends to create cesspools beyond control.
     
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  5. Sonic Angel Knight

    OP Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Legend
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    Thank you for understanding. :)

    I was aware this is a "SUBJECTIVE OPINION" situation, but I tried my best to list various reasons of pro and con, but not making it to controversial. I do think is only good with a healthy balance of both. Yes I like the internet cause i can play with people all over the world, if i have no one here to play with. I do like playing with people in the same room. So far, advances to simulate playing games like we used to in the form of online gaming is trying more and more to close in on the winning solution. Still people are free to do as they please which won't change but is always a interest of new things being introduced giving us people new opportunities and even some abandoning old ones in favor of new ones. Whatever the case yes, is a complete opinion based response I am looking for.
     
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  6. cvskid

    cvskid GBAtemp Addict
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    Have to deal with lag, input delay, and overall people saying/doing things they wouldn't normally do because they have the safety of the internet between them and you like taunting, teabagging, ragequitting, and overall having to deal with age groups that aren't even old enough to be playing said game/series in the first place. I know that some people say to have thicker skin and it's the internet so that's just the way it is but not everyone is like that. Almost seems rare to find decent human beings playing online these days.

    For offline the main things you worry about is it you have any friends in real life with the time to hang out and play videogames offline or if they are even interested in what you like to play to begin with.
    If you don't then you have to see if there is a local community for the games you like to play and if not then you try to see if you can get enough people interested to make a community or offline get together yourself.
     
  7. tetrabrik

    tetrabrik Advanced Member
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    yes local multiplayer is now an afterthought because the convenience of online play makes it a much more appealing prospect to potential customers, hence developers tend to leave local out. there's also complexities in the coding and rendering aspect, esp. if you do split-screen, which might make the feature prohibitively expensive to implement.

    and at the risk of dating myself, man do I miss LAN parties... that was the best kind of local multiplayer
     
  8. Deleted User

    Deleted User Newbie

    I don't usually like playing local multiplayer in games, but for the few games that I DO wanna play with maybe my sister or something, there's a way to play multiplayer. Mario Kart, Portal 2, Minecraft PS3 edition, any of the Little Big Planet series, etc. It's even there in tons of games that I'll probably never have the chance to play with people I know in real life (or not for a long time anyways), like Borderlands. Also, the few friends I know in real life all usually have games on different platforms than what I own, so if I do wanna play a game with them, I have to go over to their house and do local multiplayer, or they have to come over to my house. I kinda wish we all had the same consoles so we could just play online since we also now live in different parts of the city and it's a bit difficult to just kinda travel over to someone's house to play a game.

    Also, I've always had anxiety problems to some extent, but recently they've worsened. If it weren't for the internet, I'd probably be stuck with the few friends I made before my anxiety got worse, and even then I wouldn't really interact with them much if I couldn't talk to them over Facebook, Skype, Discord or something since I have this weird fear of talking over the phone. The internet in general has made it possible for me to actually socialise with some people with few anxiety related problems, and it's also made it a lot easier to meet people with similar interests.
     
  9. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer
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    "Play with your little brother"

    "Stop swearing"

    "Don't be a pussy and let me beat you again."

    All things I heard during the 8-32 bit eras.

    Edit. 13 year olds have good reactions as well. Quite nice to have such people playing battlefield or something with me.
     
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  10. Sliter

    Sliter GBAtemp Psycho!
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    I like more local multiplayer too but well
    I could never.. NEVER play my GBA mario kart multplayer and I was crazy for this when I was kid (because no one to play together)
    I played a LOT of online mario kart on 3DS :B
    So there are bad things but also had some nice things
     
  11. Deleted User

    Deleted User Newbie

    I think the internet ruined part of the mystique that games used to have.

    Back then, games were rather mysterious. There could be secret levels or content that might or might not exist in the game, depending on whether what some guy at school said was true. There could be outlandish theories made about some games, like Luigi being a super-secret playable character in Mario 64, or some malicious villager in Animal Crossing moving into your town, chopping down your trees, and kidnapping other villagers. Theories like that may have been false, but they were cool, and added a sense of mystery to games. Finding out a secret playable character in an arcade game through some random combo input must have felt very rewarding. Same goes for capturing a legendary Pokemon you weren't sure even existed until now.

    Nowadays, if people want to know some aspect of a game, they can just look it up on YouTube. Things are more concrete; it either is in the game or it isn't. It's harder to mess with people in games when you can just go on GameFAQs and read up on all secrets a game has. Even worse, people can potentially just poke around through the game's files. It's gotten to the point where we literally have to go out of our way to avoid accidentally discovering secrets about a game on YouTube or any old gaming forum.

    In a sense, I find this ruins the mystery games used to have about them, and in my opinion, part of the fun.
     
    Last edited Aug 19, 2017
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  12. Quantumcat

    Quantumcat Dead and alive
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    Exactly!!! This is almost an allegory of childhood. What's underneath the house or in the big drain? Treasure? The bones of a kid who explored too far and got easten by some animal? Who knows? The world is a big, delightful mystery. But adults know that all there is under the house is dirt and spiders, and the drains eventually connect to another drain and all there is inside is slime. No longer exciting because you know everything. Games were more exciting when you couldn't know everything.
     
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  13. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer
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    In real life I pull things apart and figure out how they work. It is great fun.
    In games I am also able to pull things apart and figure out how they work, be in games or with my disassembler. It is also great fun.

    Having someone be able to skim the groundwork (give or take http://mentalfloss.com/article/85311/10-video-game-easter-eggs-took-years-discover ) does not detract for me and there is still plenty of mystery to explore.
     
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  14. Wolfy

    Wolfy Person That Never Was
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    I know that both opinions can be supported in this world full of massively multiplayer server and spoilers ahead of release. Local co-op is the only thing that I feel died, but I don't even know if that's out of greed that less co-op means more people buying consoles or that porting co-op to PCs that may have not been able to run two separate perspectives( although I feel that's an issue of the past now ).

    I don't think the situation will ever be black and white, since there's plenty of good like downloading games/updates straight to your console, whereas it enables developers to not care so much about release since they can fix issues later on through bug fixes.

    The only thing I truly miss is being in school where I was younger, able to walk home with friends to their house and play games together, or even with my brother whenever we didn't fight.
     
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  15. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter
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    Heh...nice necrobump, @Wolfy. Digging up a thread for 2017 is one thing. But it's an interesting read. And the probable change with corona aside, it's probably still as relevant as four years ago. :)


    As for my opinion: it stayed somewhat the same for me. In my youth, video games were sort of a personal escapism. I consumed them like I did with books: I just explored the worlds more interactive than books. Talking about games wasn't something we did among friends. Oh, sure: the shared super nintendo we had saw quite some couch co-op play, but I can barely recall discussing anything in the sense you would expect ("this is too hard!" "Peach looks...kind of pretty, right? :blush:" or those things early teens kind of should say). I mean...my nephew and niece came over (ages 4 and 6) last weekend to, among others, play some wiiu. Nephew is usually very shy/introvert, but once we got on the mario race track or played Mario bros U, he could barely stop talking. :P

    ...but back to me. In my UT days, I...erm...talked more than average. That is to say: Unreal Tournament (and later 2004) was a very fast paced first person shooter before voice chat became a thing. Merely stopping to type even one or two words could get you fragged instantly. So in that strange environment where most communication consisted of "GG" at the end of the match, I started using key binds to taunts to show sportsmanship. First were the included taunts ("nice!" "boom!" "Oh yeah!" "You like that?"...that stuff), later I added an entire scheme to communicate e.g. flagrunners positions with at most two key presses. It's not that I spammed those buttons, but about 4 or 5 of those comments in a 30-minute match kind of stands out when the other 15 players are complete mutes. :P
    Also loved the two or three LAN's I been to. Was great to meet clanmates and semi-clanmates in person. I thought things would be more chatty, but when we started playing the only real difference was that the ping was much lower (which ironically made the pauzes of gaming the best moments).

    After that, I mostly stuck to singleplayer games again (starcraft 2 was the only exception...and I didn't talk there). Hung out on forums a lot (and still do, obviously ;) ), but about the only real co-op games I played were couch co-ops. As mentioned above: I like nintendo games for this feature. Their games are never about technological power but always about making sure it's a fun time. As such, I'm looking forward to the day my daughter's old enough to hold a controller. ;)

    I've been with my girlfriend for nearly six years. Never got her into console gaming (awww :( ). But I've grown into loving board games at least equally much. It's not just the social interaction (read: if board games mostly consisted of rehashing the same gameplay loops of the same franchiches in ever slightly better graphics, I wouldn't be into board games at all), but it's an important part of it.
    When the pandemic hit, I had dabbled into tabletop simulator for a couple hours. It has since become my most played game (at around 300 hours), and continues to grow. For the obvious reason: I set up a hangout session with friends alongside the game, so we can chat as if we were together in all but disease-carrying ways. Sure, the excuse is "I've got to teach the rules", but really: that is sort of less crucial than just being able to chat with others.
     
  16. Daggot

    Daggot GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    This is highly subjective but it improved it somewhat at first and then as the years went by ruined it.
     
  17. Wolfy

    Wolfy Person That Never Was
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    Ah you know what it was, normally I just check the news and go off the sidebar of interesting recently updated threads, pretty sure for the first time I saw something interesting in "similar threads" and didn't think anything of it. Sorry for bringing back the dead!
     
  18. BlazeMasterBM

    BlazeMasterBM I Eat Garlics
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    idk either. But I still lonely egghead.png
     
  19. Hells_Judge

    Hells_Judge Banned
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    Parsec has made playing fighting games with no netplay easier than ever before. Sure, you're not gonna be running EVO with it, but for most everyone, it's good enough.
     
  20. notimp

    notimp Well-Known Member
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    I have an opinion on this. Its actually oversimplified.. ;)

    Human socializing works on the principle of reciprocity. Actually on the expectation of reciprocity. (Good manners, being friendly to everyone, .. they all derive from that).

    The internet works on the principle of faked reciprocity. As in - it rewards people who fake acts of reciprocity (f.e. large scale, low effort)).

    As in "socializing" on social networks doesnt work. As in political movements dont work online. As in its easy to get large crowds of people to form at a certain place and point in time - but then they dont have the fixed social bonds, that would sustain lets say f.e. a political protest movement. So f.e. make them feel responsible for each other.

    So online socialization is "different". More parasocial relationships ("I idolize Major Nelson!" (hes my default for many of the blogger related sociology stuff, dont pin me down on that too hard.. ;) ), more "PewDiePie is my best friend", less real reciprocity. Less commitment. Lower stakes. Lower involvement level, ...

    So it depends what you are looking for. :)

    I think of that stuff, whenever facebook tells me (usually in their marketing ads.. ;) ), that it added so much value to the world, because it connected people from all kind of different suburbs, to give them common identity... ;)
     
    Last edited by notimp, May 23, 2021
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