Do you know or use the sign language or finger spelling?

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by JeepX87, Dec 10, 2016.

  1. JeepX87
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    JeepX87 GBAtemp Regular

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    It is primary method to communicate with HoH and deaf people, so just curious, did you meet with them before?

    For me, I'm profoundly deaf at birth due to Usher Syndrome, so I use ASL for sign language and typing/written in English. I do know about TASL, but I don't use it often. There are many different sign languages over all countries, but USA has 3 different sign languages.

    HoH = hard of hearing
    ASL = American Sign Language
    TASL = Tactile version of American Sign Language (communicate with deafblind people)
     
    Last edited by JeepX87, Dec 10, 2016
  2. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Many years ago I did some BSL, probably should have continued it more as I am likely to find it more useful in years to come but lip reading (or perhaps lip assisted) carried me through instead, and never found ASL to my taste (having to occasionally use my face always feels like a game of charades and I hate charades). Also been the test case for rapid learning makaton before which was fun, though not as effective as other rapid learning for languages and things I have done.

    Today any signing type things I do are military inspired things or industrial purposes (speaking of which American industrial hand signals, or at least the ones I was taught over there, are so easy to confuse or not be able to tell at a distance), though my mum, dad and I do fairly well with gestures and lip reading in noisy locations, or if someone is on the phone.
     
  3. Cyan

    Cyan GBATemp's lurking knight

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    I never learned it, and know only "thank you" in French sign language. I'm always curious about it and always heard it's easy/fast to learn (you could learn it in 2 years), but never had any use to do it.
    I profoundly find it stupid that it's not really a "language" by itself but more a transcription of an actual language : French has its own sign language, American has its own sign language, Japanese has its own, etc. every language has a different sign language.
    to me it's not really a language you learn and let you communicate with other people in the world using it, it's adapted from another form of language (the oral one) and depends on its culture and word's needs.

    it's too bad that it's not an international and unique communication method.


    Isn't it hard to learn to read/write when you are deaf? you can't put sounds and pronunciation on words you read.
    Are you reading words by visual memory or putting "sound" on them?

    I can hardly read without "speaking and hearing" the word in my mind. I can read without doing it, which let me read quicker but I miss some words and can sometime miss the meaning of the sentence.
    when I read a book, I have a different voice in my head for each character's talking. narrator has a different voice, etc.

    So I'm wondering how full deaf people are reading words they never heard. It's even hard for me to explain it, I miss some word to express what I mean. I hope you'll understand what I want to ask.
    are you imagining a sign for each word? are you linking a word to something? an impression, an odor, a gest, a thought, color, etc. reading the word as an all, or decomposing it by syllabus while reading it?
     
  4. JeepX87
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    JeepX87 GBAtemp Regular

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    The sign language is best alternative if you are early/born deaf and unable or too difficult to use oral language, but learn to written in English is mandatory. The sign language usually happen in smaller communities. It does consider as sign language but it isn't intended to replace the written in English because more than 95% to 99% of worlds are hearing communities. Most HoH people can learn to use spoken language, but some of them are struggling for various factors. It is depends on individuals.

    I had speech therapy for 10 years with no success, so I gave up and all priority goes to improve on my written language, that's most important. In US, most cases, K-12 schools are doing poor job with written language so deaf people left with minimal written language. I noticed that English courses at colleges are much better than in K-12 schools. I know that my English isn't perfect, so never will be. I just want to ensure if anyone could understand about what I'm saying.

    No, it isn't hard to learn to read and write if you are deaf because of different tendencies, but it will take much time to make read and write more reasonable to understand. The phonics are often absent in deaf education (sign language + written language only) so that's make difficult for them to be proficient in written language, but it could be improved eventually. Of course, I do reading words by visual memory (no sound), but sometime, I have to define to give more detail.

    The literature is one of my most weakest spot, so that why I didn't read any literature books. I'm very good with reading on newspapers, articles, research and could understand most member's statements. There is problem - the literature isn't my thing but I do know that some deaf people are master with literature. I do understand better if sign language + visual language are used in literature.

    For last question, yes, exactly, that's what I'm using. For ASL, I don't use - I, am, is, are, the, -ed, -ing, a, an, etc. It is more like slang language to make communication more faster.

    English: I'm going to the store to buy Pokemon Moon version.
    ASL: me go store buy Pokemon Moon version

    For use full English in sign language - it will be SEE and PSE (in US).

    SEE = Signed Exact English
    PSE = Pidgin Signed English (same as ASL but follow the words in correct order)

    I don't know if BSL (British Sign Language) use same structure as ASL, but different linguistic and gestures.

    Most sign language have own code to follow, but sometime, regions could make difference, like California and Alabama use ASL, but they do have some different parts.
     
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  5. Cyan

    Cyan GBATemp's lurking knight

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    thank you.
    I find your written english and grammar very good. It probably requires more work for deaf people to achieve the same level as other people.
     
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  6. hippy dave

    hippy dave Butts Butts Megabutts

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    I learned the (British, two-handed) signed alphabet when I was in cub scouts as a kid. Then I've had a deaf friend from childhood who had hearing aids, then went 100% deaf, then got a cochlear implant - he started using sign language, and taught me a few signs but we mostly got by with lip reading and the alphabet (now he can hear pretty well). My wife is also deaf since she was fairly young but had already learned to talk, she's always got by with hearing aids and lip reading (she now has a BAHA), but we've pretty much decided to both learn sign language, we just haven't done it yet because we're shit at getting things done.

    Have you ever watched a tv show called Switched at Birth? Has some deaf main characters and lots of ASL, my wife loved it because of that but it's also a pretty great show mostly.
     
    Last edited by hippy dave, Dec 10, 2016
  7. DinohScene

    DinohScene Capture the Dino

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    I only know how to flip people off.
    Sadly...
     
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  8. CIAwesome526

    CIAwesome526 Im ugly and im proud

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    I know how to sign "the cake is a lie" because i included it as an easter egg in my concept video for an app meant to help people who dont know sign language communivate with hearing impaired people. it was a school project.
     
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  9. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Flipping people off is but one of a series of obscene gestures. I highly suggest learning to call people a wanker too.

    The makaton thing was aimed more at concepts rather than a measure of transcription, though it was not designed as a complex means of communication as it is designed for people that otherwise have neurological issues or other impairments to communication.

    Equally not all are pure transcription, for a start British Sign Language and American are radically different, the story going because an American came over to the UK to learn it and was dismissed so went to France instead. To this day French sign language probably has more in common with ASL than the BSL despite both being used for English communications.
    The other reason is because people have been less than briliiant at hearing for hundreds of years and thus you have the same reason we don't have a universal language today.

    That said the inner linguist does wonder how a universal sign language might adapt to all the various different types of grammar used around the world ( http://esl.fis.edu/grammar/langdiff/index.htm ).
     
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  10. Flame

    Flame Me > You

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    i so wish i did. its always nice to know new stuff.

    Language is very interesting to me. from coding language to sign language.


    by the way welcome to GBATemp is always nice to have people all kinds of background. :)
     
  11. JeepX87
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    JeepX87 GBAtemp Regular

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    Yes, I noticed that many hearing students are struggling with their written English in remedial English course, but they didn't receive a good education at K-12 schools in the US. When I was at public high school, I was in classes with all hearing students and ASL interpreter all day. The English teacher was too lazy to correct my papers and let me to pass the class with A, even my written English was awful. That was in 2005.

    In ENG 101, I noticed that some students received F for typing an essay paper with a lot of slang words. I do know that personal writing and academic writing are different.

    I prefer written English to ASL because it is complete sentence since ASL could be misunderstood easily if it is really long story, however, it is good for short and quick communication.

    In worst cases, I found some people can't read at all, but they can speak fine, so it is pain for me to deal with it.

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    Yes, I watched this show before and I found one is interesting on Freeform.

    Unrelated to this show, in US, Freeform (formerly ABC Family) has some religious material (like 700 Club) that probably not existed on British TV so I just wonder about why Disney can't buy CBN to take 100% ownership, so it will have more time slot to re-run all TV programmings that owned by ABC and Disney.