Creating with your Pencil.

Discussion in 'GBAtemp Art Studio' started by Myke, Sep 6, 2005.

Sep 6, 2005

Creating with your Pencil. by Myke at 1:38 AM (8,312 Views / 0 Likes) 32 replies

  1. Myke
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    Member Myke so tasty!

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    if you like to draw but have a hard time developing ideas,
    here's a quick and easy way to help you with pretty much anything you want to create.

    all you need is a pencil and some tracing paper and you are set.

    you can also use this method to draw from photo reference, or for certain parts you are having difficulties in a big piece you are working on.

    I'm going to use a face I did using this method as an example.

    first you take some regular paper and and keep drawing whatever you want to draw until you come up with a good idea, be it a pose or a scene or whatever. just draw till you find something you kinda like that you would like to see more rendered.

    once you find something, take out the tracing paper, and roughtly sculpt with your pencil what you want to do. just worry loosly about proportions just put everything there

    [​IMG]

    after you did that, you take a fresh piece of tracing paper and lay it on top of the first one

    then you start drawing over that. you can fix proportion errors this way. still keep it rough but a little tighter in terms of lighting. don't do much detail.

    [​IMG]

    repeat the process, place another piece of tracing paper on top of your second drawing, and keep refining it. slowly working in the detail and lighting

    [​IMG]

    keep doing this until you feel you are complete.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I stopped at five, but there are always things I can play around with. In the end it's your choice how far you want to go.

    and if you are one of those digital people, you can do this same exact thing on the computer with the layers and your layer opacity

    happy drawing. and keep at it!

    UPDATE:

    if you are into character design and still sorta don't get it, I did a character development study to show you

    again start drawing poses on scrap paper till you find one you like
    1) draw the pose loosely. worry about basic shapes and basic proportions
    [​IMG]

    2) start tightening things up a little, worry about the anatomy and tighten the first drawing. you can see that I didn't like the arm dangling on the first one so I changed it.
    [​IMG]

    3) now start adding smaller details like roughly do the eyes and face and start putting clothes on the figure
    [​IMG]

    4) here's my final piece. You may notice that the line quality is lighter. That's because I did the first three drawing with graphite pencil, and this last one with mechanical pencil so I can be tight and accurate. Also notice the strokes I used for the boots and miniskirt. They follow the form, which helps the viewer understand the form underneath the clothes (that and it's another level of depth you can achieve with your art)
    [​IMG]

    happy drawing.
     


  2. th3sandm4n

    Member th3sandm4n I'm here for the knowledge!

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    will try if I ever get off my ass to the art store ;P
    Hope to see more tut's from you Myke

    PS- I like #4
     
  3. Luse

    Banned Luse Now with more MOOSE!!!

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    Or you can do it like me and use a lightbox [​IMG]

    ...but good ones cost money...

    The one thing I love about tracing paper is how well it smudges, rub your finger over pencil marks and you can get a good buid up for toning a drawing

    Good idea here myke, it'll help some people, I'll sticky it for further instructions [​IMG]
     
  4. Myke
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    Member Myke so tasty!

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    actually I have one, it's just not so usefull with bristol board heh, but yeah light box and printer paper works the same way. I like tracing paper better for that exact reason you just wrote. the smudging.

    oh and thanks for the sticky BTW
     
  5. memyselfandi

    Member memyselfandi GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    good job*claps* [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. lolsjoel

    Member lolsjoel GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    ^ That's a lot to quote...
     
  7. Myke
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    Member Myke so tasty!

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    updated with a character design section for all you character designers out there.
     
  8. Dragonlord

    Member Dragonlord Linux-Dragon of quick wit and sharp tongue

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    nice tutorial myke. had once a self made light box myself but somehow i didn't get my head round this technic. since then i draw the char with pencil and nearly no pressure, then giving more pressure on lines that look like they please me and rub others that are not good.

    about yours... you do redraw in each step the figure or do you leave shining through what is below? (i think not as you would suddenly move the paper in an odd way and it's off, but who knows)
     
  9. Myke
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    Member Myke so tasty!

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    first I use tracing paper, so you don't need a light box at all, and of course I redraw the figure because there's always something that needs to be fixed =)
     
  10. th3sandm4n

    Member th3sandm4n I'm here for the knowledge!

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    wow, like the Updatde =)
    The shading on the skirt and boots certainly owns, great tip I'll try and impliment....I'm in such a non creative slump now =/
     
  11. Psyfira

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    Cheap improvised alternative: plain jotter paper. It's thin enough to see through whilst still having a solid white page to work on, and if you have a huge pad of the stuff the plain sheets below whatever you're tracing help make the lines show thorugh to the sheet you're drawing onto. May need to be in a fairly well lit room for it to work though, dependant on how faint your original sketch was. Best of all it's dirt cheap; 100 sheets for about a quid. (or 200 sheets if you know where to look *cough*student union shop*cough* [​IMG])

    I redraw figures a lot, mainly cuz I'm too lazy to clean up my construction lines or I've pressed far too hard while drawing them to be able to get them off the paper! [​IMG] I've never gotten the hang of this press lightly thing.
     
  12. Darkforce

    Former Staff Darkforce DERP!

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    Wow, really impressive Myke.

    *Sigh* it's my friends birthday on Sunday, and I'm trying to design her a card. I've been desperate to get out the habit of using copyrighted characters in work I produce (need to start doing stuff to put in my portfolio), the problem is that my characters look really generic and uninspiring... I think my biggest problem is hair, especially long hair and elaborate hairstyles.

    Oh and any recommendations for a graphics tablet? I'd absolutely love to get a wacom but I've got a budget of around £40-50 so I can't afford anything larger than A6... I might get lucky and find an A5 one second hand cheap, however any suggestions for other reputable brand would be good. Currently I have an old cheap ass Medion tablet, nice size (A4+) but the pen is awful; it's just about useable for basic colouring but that's about it, lol.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Myke
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    Member Myke so tasty!

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    wacom's the best, I thighly highly suggest you save the money and get a nice big Intuos 3. OR you can look on Ebay since the Intuos 3 just came out, you could probably find the Intuos 2 for dirt cheap. that ons is great too.
    as for the JOtter paper, where you gonna find a piece of jotter paper that's really big if you need a big piece? I never really used jotter paper. I thought it came in colors not white (at least I'm looking on google and I don't see it white). but if it works thats great =). I still can't find anything good about this paper, but Jotter pens. Is Jotter just a brand name ? In the end I think I find tracing paper the most usefull though. No need for a lightbox, no need for extremily good lighting.

    so you are wondering, well how the hell do I transfer my final drawing on the actual piece of paper I am working on???

    there are different ways to do this.

    1) Simply scan it, and print it out on the paper you want to do your piece on (I do this but I have an epson 2200. I suggest you do this if you have a good and big enough printer)

    2) simply copy it. By the time you are done with the piece on tracing paper you probably drew that figure five or six times. That means the figure is fresh in your head, you will notice that you won't have a hard time copying it.

    3) take the sheet of tracing paper you did your final drawing on. Flip it to the side where there is no drawing, rub graphite ALL OVER it. now flip the drawing around again and place it on the sheet of paper right side up with the actualy drawing facing you, then start tracing your drawing. The graphite on the back functions as transfer paper. When you press down, because of that graphite, it leaves a line on the piece of paper under the tracing paper.
     
  14. Zarcon

    Former Staff Zarcon .:~Enigmatic Wanderer~:.

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    These are great Myke, thanks for giving up your time to make these. [​IMG]

    I'd just like to point out that another alternative is to do all this on Photoshop with seperate layers acting as the tracing paper if you're confident with using a tablet, or heck, a mouse if you're really good at it.
    Although this only applies if you're not going for the pencil look and plan to colour it on the computer or make a print and paint over it.

    Once again, thanks Myke. [​IMG]
     
  15. Dragonlord

    Member Dragonlord Linux-Dragon of quick wit and sharp tongue

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    this one is a nifty one. got to try this out if i find a conventional pencil somewhere.
     
  16. Psyfira

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    You got me there; A4's about as big as it goes!

    I doubt it'll be for retail online. It's not a brand name, it's just a nickname (maybe only used in the UK; I'm getting the impression it means a journalist's notebook in the states?) they give to really cheap and nasty thin white paper, the kind of crap that you'd find in a cheap stationary shop for kiddies to draw on. It is harder to see through than tracing paper thou, so I reckon it's way below the level of something a professional artist would even consider using.

    It looks like Tracing paper's definitely the way to go for decent quality stuff. Jotter's more like plan B for someone who's still learning and doesn't want to spend the extra money trashing decent tracing paper.

    This' just my humble opinion anyway; remeber which one of us is the professional artist here [​IMG]
     
  17. kev3458

    Member kev3458 GBAtemp Regular

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    Nice tut, very creative...cept I'm not that good at drawing, so it didn't come out that well...[​IMG]
     
  18. thegame07

    Member thegame07 GBAtemp Psycho!

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    it reminds me of hotel dusk [​IMG]
     
  19. Hitto

    Member Hitto MKDS Tournament Winner

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    Nice work, Myke! Are you doing this on your free time, or do you want to make it a living?

    It may sound stupid, but the very best way to gain technique is by copying. Copycopycopycopycopy everything you see. Find a nice manga drawing? Copy it. Wanna draw an 8-bit mushroom? Copy it. Salvador Dali? You're gonna take a few fucking days on your first try, but copy it! You're working at opening your mind here, so copy even the stuff you think looks like shit, or is in a totally different genre than what you usually like to do!

    And always do your best to add your own touch! Else you're just tracing stuff, you learn much less. It's still good to do plain copies, though.

    There are gems hidden in every piece of art you can see, and most importantly : inspiration. The more you gorge your eyes on foreign work, the more yours will be diverse and unique.
     
  20. Psyfira

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    Not sure I entirely agree with that, I mean direct copying other images is a good place to start to pick up skills but it can only get you so far. I've got a friend who's absolutely amazing at copying stuff, put an illustrated book in front of her and she could replicate pretty much anything in it. But try to get her to draw a person and she's hopeless.

    Copying's fine for working out new ways to use media and shading techniques, but if you're just carbon-copying pictures it can't teach you perspective, compostition, anatomy or colour theory. (I suppose using references is a form of copying, using parts of another image to help you with sections of yours in which case yes that is rather useful)
     

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