Components used on the Switch (mostly the motherboard and main console)

Discussion in 'Switch - Console, Accessories & Hardware' started by WadsRUs, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    I've been thinking of starting a thread which lists replacement parts to help those who have the soldering skills and equipment to repair at a component level (in this case, many of the components are microscopic).

    I've repaired a few Switches over the past few months (often needing to only replace the USB C port on the console, it's a common point of failure) although I've recently ventured into replacing the M92T36 charging chip. Unfortunately on my first attempt I managed to lose some of the extremely small caps and resistors that are adjacent to that chip so if anyone happens to know the capacitance and resistance values of those, along with parts numbers, I'd be very grateful (on my second attempt I didn't lose any caps or resistors). :)

    I'd like to create a list of all of the smaller, surface mounted components found on the board with a view to making a full list of what goes where, the value of each part (resistance, capacitance, etc) along with part numbers and suppliers (in the UK there are places like RS and Farnell for example who are bound to carry such common parts, I'd also like to list suppliers in other countries). This also applies to the very fragile Flat Flex Cable (FFC) connectors - for example, here is the FFC connector for the Joycon ribbon cables on the console motherboard -

    https://www.mouser.co.uk/ProductDetail/538-503566-1100 (thanks to mattytrog for this link).

    I'd also like to include on the list the ICs and RAM chips found on the motherboard.

    The M92T36 (charging power control chip) can be found on Ebay, Aliexpress, etc. This is the component that is often damaged when a third party docking station is used.

    Here is the battery charger chip - https://uk.farnell.com/texas-instru...ptor-charger-li-24vqfn/dp/2254993?ost=BQ24193


    The USB C connector can easily be found on Ebay, prices are around £5 each if buying locally, although importing from China is of course cheaper (but slower to deliver).

    As for easier non-soldering repairs, Ebay can also be used for the game card slot and the micro SD card slot, the same applies to the fan and battery plus other parts like the rails that the Joycons slide into.

    There's no harm in expanding this to also cover the docking station, Joycons and Pro Controller.

    Feel free to add any useful information to this thread, particularly part numbers and sources.
     
    Last edited by WadsRUs, Dec 2, 2018
  2. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    components. Yay! Found the thread!

    Can we make a TinySoldering™️ meme? ;)

    Thank fook I`m second poster!

    Right... Heres something to get you going... @WadsRUs

    EDIT: 24.06.19 Correction of BQ24193 47nF cap
     
    Last edited by mattytrog, Jun 24, 2019
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  3. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Welcome! :)

    TinySoldering? I'd like to rename it to BloodyMicroscopicSoldering (some of those resistors are only half a millimetre long!). :)
     
  4. g00s3y

    g00s3y Asshole

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    Major credit to anyone who does soldering at this small of a level. I dropped out of my EET major because I hated soldering. I can replace anything that doesn't require solder, but even basic soldering I suck at.

    Same with welding. I can replace everything on a car, rebuild an engine/transmission, etc. But I wouldn't be able to weld an exhaust together without it looking like it was done by a person with 1 hand that only has 3 fingers.
     
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  5. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    For TinySolderingGuy™️, soldering 0201 sized stuff should be like soldering to the bow of a ship...

    Anyway. I suppose we better get down to business...

    I plan to begin, if OK, with a couple of photos of a motherboard showing the most common damage from failed modchip fitting and components required. Will complete in morning. As been a 3am start for me today and I`m Fooked™️
     
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  6. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Dude, if you've had a long day then leave it until you're feeling more awake, it's not a problem but huge thanks in advance for anything that you can offer.

    Speaking of 0201 sized components, are most of the resistors on the motherboard of the 0201 size? For example the ones close to the M92T36 ? I see that most are the same size. Sadly I know little about surface mount component sizes for the passives but, looking on the bright side, I appear to be able to replace them as required. :)
     
    Last edited by WadsRUs, Dec 3, 2018
  7. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    The smallest ones around the m92t36 are 0201... The next size up are 0402. Those 2 sizes around m92t36.

    The carbon film 50mW resistors are VERY easily damaged.
     
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  8. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Thanks, noted.

    As for the caps around the M92T36, most (but not all) appear to be the same physical size, is that 0402 ? For example on one side of the chip there are three caps vertically side by side and one at a right angle to those three, what size are they?

    Are they also all of the same capacitance? (can't test accurately in circuit).


    What I plan to do is take a high res photo of the M92T36 and immediate area and label up all of the closest components - it seems a good place to start as that chip is the one most people are going to try and replace and, if they're new at this (like me) they'll end up knocking or blowing off some of the passives. I may in fact have to label up two photos as I've noticed a subtly different layout of some of the passives on two different motherboards. If I knew how to use PCB CAD software it would of course be best to draw it in that, but sadly I don't. Maybe if I put together some annotated photos somebody else may volunteer to help out on the PCB CAD side. :)
     
    Last edited by WadsRUs, Jan 4, 2019
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  9. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    On the matter of the battery connector on the motherboard, this is the closest that I can find so far -

    https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/pcb-headers/7000836/

    However that won't work as the one on the Switch motherboard has assorted notches in the plastic that the wired connector slots into. One option would be to replace the motherboard connector with the above (it should fit I think) but to also replace the wired connector from the battery.

    I THINK this is the crimp housing which fits the above connector (the crimp terminals would also probably be needed) -

    https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/pcb-connector-housings/7001013/



    I suppose the parts used by Nintendo could have been designed especially for them of course.

    If anyone has any ideas, especially on a source for the original Nintendo connector, please let us know.


    Edit: This one looks even closer to the Nintendo original -

    https://uk.farnell.com/jst-japan-so...f/connector-header-5pos-1row-1-2mm/dp/2846984
     
    Last edited by WadsRUs, Dec 4, 2018
  10. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Brilliant, thanks for this mattytrog - not sure how I missed this but it's extremely useful. :D

    I'll try and add to that over the next few days with resistance measurements of the resistors around the M92T36.
     
  11. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    Ok. You may struggle with that as there are some in parallel with caps and inductors (I thinmk if memory serves me)

    Would probably be better recording resistance, capacitive reactance and inductive reactance and let people pick their own accordingly. Removing 0201 resistors just to measure them isn`t fun. At all.

    When working it out, don`t forget (capacitive reactance) Xc = 1 / 2 pies for christmas (2 x Pi x F x C).
    Xl (Inductive reactance) = 2 pies for lunch (2 x Pi (3.142 or 22/7) x F (in Hz) x L (in Henrys). Both measured in ohms.

    Looooong time since I went to college so probably wrong. Double-check!
     
    Last edited by mattytrog, Dec 6, 2018
  12. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Ah, hadn't studied them enough to notice that some were in parallel. I certainly don't want to remove any just to measure them individually.

    BTW, the caps near the M92T36 - one one side of the M92T36 there are three caps side by side then immediately to the right there is one at a right angle - would you happen to know the values of those please?
     
  13. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    Tell you what... I`ve got to nip out. I`ll whip the back off one when I get back and do some pokey proddy action.
     
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  14. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Sounds like a fine plan, many thanks. :D
     
  15. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Some more potentially useful information - anyone who has replaced the USB C port on the motherboard will know that you can never be certain if the second row of pins have been soldered in place correctly as they are underneath the connector.

    Here's a way to check if they are making contact with their solder pads.

    First, either buy a bare USB C male connector like this -

    https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/type-c-usb-connectors/1225149/

    or chop the end off a good USB C cable that has all 24 pins connected (not easy to do due to the very thin wires which each need to be stripped - buying the bare connector is far easier!).

    Now plug this into the USB C port on the removed motherboard (don't do this with the battery connected or the board in the Switch shell of course!). Make sure it snaps in properly, it's a snug fit and you also don't want to bend any of its pins when pushing it in.


    Now, there are some pins which are duplicated for both rows of pins - take a look at this pinout:

    https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/291413/usb-c-to-usb-a-pinout

    You'll see that there are some duplicated pin functions on both rows of pins - GND and +5 volts - so the 'hidden' GND and +5 volts pins on the 'B' side are easy to test with a multimeter set to continuity test (with the usual beep for continuity). GND is easy to find, +5 volts has a test pad just to the right of the USB C connector - there's two test pads there, it's the top one).

    Pins A6, A7, B6, B7 crossover to each other if continuity tested on a board with the USB C connector removed yet seemingly not with the connector in place - no doubt because these are for USB 2.0 high speed and are not used?


    Now flip the board upside down - all non-duplicated 'hidden' pins go to components on the rear.

    So with the board upside down you'll see just above the USB C connector is a rectangular chip - this is PI3USB30532, a "6:4 differential channel bi-directional matrix switch solution for switching USB3.0 and/or DP1.2 signals through USB3.0 Type-C connector"

    https://www.diodes.com/products/con...es/usb-switches/part/PI3USB30532#tab-overview

    Below it, closer to the USB C connector, are some SMT caps and then some other almost square 4-pin components which I think are filters (correct me if I'm wrong).

    Now use the continuity test on your multimeter to buzz through the 'hidden' pins - B2, B3, B8, B10, B11 - to the filters (or the resistors above them) which they connect to, as mentioned above. I haven't drawn a diagram but it's easy enough to connect a probe to any of the aforementioned USB C pins and touch the connections on the resistors or filters to see if there's continuity. However, B5 goes to a separate component, namely the tiny 6-pin chip just to the left of the USB C connector (still the underside) - B5 goes to pin 5 on that chip, the lower middle pin (or there's a suitable test pad just to the left of that chip for that pin - it's the lower of the two pads).

    You can do the same tests for the 'A' pins (but there usually shouldn't be a need as these are easy to access and can be tweaked with a needle to see if they are soldered in place). Note: A5, like B5, goes to the small chip to the left of the USB C connector - pin 2 in this case, or the upper test pad just to the left of that chip.

    Of course this may not help if the 'hidden' pins have poor solder joints but it's the best we've got for now (unless anyone can suggest otherwise?).

    Sorry if the above sounds long-winded - it's far easier to do it than to write it down!

    Thanks to gbatemp member npavlovici who suggested to check the pinout this way - I'd thought of doing it before but his suggestion made me think "okay then, let's do it!". :)
     
    Last edited by WadsRUs, Dec 7, 2018
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  16. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    The way I do it, is check continuity across all pins one way, then flip the plug over, then go from the opposite end as it is inverted. When fitting the USB, have the board pins (both rows) facing you... Apply heat from the bottom, so your hot air gun is actually pointing upwards. Loads of flux on the port side pins, plenty of heat, I go around 390... Gives you a little working time. Just dab it on. Make sure it's level and through the holes enough. It's best if you clear the holes I find before hand. You can then give it a practice fit and observe where it should be. It's easy to move it slightly to the right and left, causing a misalignment.

    The key is as little heat as possible to the new port.
     
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  17. The Real Jdbye

    The Real Jdbye Always Remember 30/07/08

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    Good luck, they are about as hard to get soldered back into place as they are to avoid accidentally removing.
     
  18. WadsRUs
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    WadsRUs GBAtemp Regular

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    Thanks, Yeah, good point about using as little heat as possible on the new USB C port as the plastic inside the port melts quite easily, so making the port useless (been there's done that!). I've got the knack of it now and, as you suggest, cleaning the holes first is a very good idea (as you know you need a good iron to do that as the ground plane sucks up a lot of heat so making the solder tough to remove).

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    Can't argue with you there, I'm still getting the hang of them. I really need a good microscope so that I can properly see what I'm doing when working on such miniscule parts - a 3.5x headband magnifier really isn't good enough.
     
  19. mattytrog

    mattytrog You don`t want to listen to anything I say.

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    Yep. A nice hot chisel tip iron will own that ground plane. Chemwik braid also. Add plenty of leaded solder to it as well prior to braiding it out
     
  20. The Real Jdbye

    The Real Jdbye Always Remember 30/07/08

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    You can use a camera with good zoom (I have one that has 15x zoom)
    Are you using a hot air gun or just a thin-tipped soldering iron? Trying to solder those tiny resistors/capacitors with a soldering iron sounds like it'd be more trouble than it's worth.
     
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