C++ compilers for beginners.

Discussion in 'Computer Programming, Emulation, and Game Modding' started by silent sniper, Feb 25, 2008.

Feb 25, 2008
  1. silent sniper
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    Member silent sniper !dennaB

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    well, i'm starting to learn C++ (after so much procrastination [​IMG]), and i need a compiler than can help get me to a start. i'm actually thinking of just getting microsoft visual c++.... but, i need some help choosing.

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. scruffman

    Member scruffman Advanced Member

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    I am also looking to get into programming to, any help will be much appreciated [​IMG]
     
  3. James B.

    Member James B. GBAtemp Regular

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    Microsoft Visual C++ should be great, I use it all the time. You just have to make sure you choose the correct project type when you start a new project.

    It works, and it is good, and its what I used to start. :].
     
  4. CockroachMan

    Member CockroachMan Scribbling around GBATemp's kitchen.

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    Get DevC++ (www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html)
    or Cygwin(http://cygwin.com/) and Code::Blocks(http://www.codeblocks.org/)..

    Best free C++ IDE's that I know..

    Of course you can also get MS Visual C++, but it's not free.. and IMHO, it has too much commodities, hence, it might end up training lazy programmers.. I wouldn't recommend it too beginners.. well.. just my opinion [​IMG]
     
  5. silent sniper
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    Member silent sniper !dennaB

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    hmmm, well, i've scanned through all the pages posted, and code::blocks is the most appealing, i'll give it a try.


    edit: wait a minute it's not even released yet =\

    so that means i'm going with the bloodshed one.
     
  6. Linkiboy

    Member Linkiboy GBAtemp Testing Area

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    i use notepad
     
  7. silent sniper
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    Member silent sniper !dennaB

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    and how do you compile with notepad? just copy it all into a compiler?
     
  8. notnarb

    Member notnarb Not narbing it up

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    Visual C++ express edition is free, and offers a list of applicable commands when you make a period (and the format of said commands as you type it), making it easier to learn from using it. I've also heard some good things about Notepad++

    Edit: coding in notepad is like writing essays in notepad. It's nice to have a 'spell check' and color coded commands (which most compilers have), like all 'if's and 'and's being colored green (which most compilers usually do)
     
  9. Jaejae

    Member Jaejae Superfly Don't Used

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    Gedit, and the gcc libs.
     
  10. JPH

    Banned JPH Banned

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  11. Smoko

    Newcomer Smoko Member

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    No they don't. Compilers compile your code, IDEs make it easy on the eyes.
     
  12. kwerdenker

    Newcomer kwerdenker Member

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    one thing first: don't confuse editors witch compilers. you use editors to write the code and compilers to compile that code into a program. integrated development environments (IDE) pack both things in a neat little package so it is easier to use.

    i'll have to go with notnarb on this. if you are going to work on windows get the express version of visual studio c++ which is free. the intellisense feature (that the thing with the command options notnarb mentioned. though it uses it's full power with c# it's still a great help in c++) is one of the things i miss most in all the other IDE i had to work with.
    though cockroachman does have a point. best way to learn programming is the hard way: linux, a text editor like vi and compiling through gcc over shell [​IMG] . (don't laugh! i had to learn coding c that way at my university. since then i hate vi...)

    if you rather have something not-microsoft or OS dependent you could use eclipse which can be configured through plugins to work with nearly any programming language there is. but since it's base on java it's sometimes slow as hell and often a pain in the ass to configure.

    have fun learning coding!

    p.s.: some sites you may want to bookmark. they were a great help when i was learning c++ and they still are. http://www.cppreference.com/ http://www.cplusplus.com/
     
  13. nephdj

    Member nephdj GBAtemp Fan

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    netbeans > eclipse

    eclipse is too dodgy for beginners
     
  14. Jaejae

    Member Jaejae Superfly Don't Used

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    It didn't occur to me that you were using Windows.
    IDK about a compiler, but for a simple editor, notepad++ is pretty good.
     
  15. franko

    Newcomer franko Member

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    Visual C++ Express is free, a breeze to setup and has more than enough power for a beginner (My thought was: "I´ll use this until I outgrow it" but so far haven't gotten anywhere close to needing a different IDE/Compiler.) Plus Intellisense is quite a nice hand holder.

    Big Recommendation from me.

    Also, if you're trying to get started with NDS programming, here's a tutorial on how to create and compile projects for the NDS using Visual C++.
     
  16. CockroachMan

    Member CockroachMan Scribbling around GBATemp's kitchen.

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    I didn't knew that it was free.. I'll give it a try.. been doing a lot of windows programming lately..

    And things like Intellisense and code correction are some of the commodities that I was referring to.. I've seen a lot of people out there that end up getting dependent on that kind of stuff.. put them on a Linux ambient where they have to use something like Emacs and GCC and know exactly what libraries they need to link, and they can't do nothing [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. silent sniper
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    Member silent sniper !dennaB

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    wow, thanks. the tutorial should come in handy (homebrew is really the reason i'm getting into it)

    now... i'm having some trouble choosing programs... i can't choose between this and Dev C++. i'm downloading both to test out. i'll post again later.
     
  18. Raisingod

    Member Raisingod GBAtemp Fan

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    I would go with Dev C++ since you would get whats its like to usually program in C++ (without all of the VS c++ libs) since you wouldn't use those in most cases ( most Universities use GCC and most companies don't use it as well )
     
  19. ProdigySim

    Member ProdigySim GBAtemp Regular

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    I don't know about the actual compiler for windows (I've never been completely happy with one), but Scite is a great editor.

    I've heard good things about MSVC++ though. Express edition is free.
     

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