Best watt for a soldering iron for a modchip?

Discussion in 'Sony PlayStation 1 & 2' started by Jack-Of-Trades, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. Jack-Of-Trades
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    Member Jack-Of-Trades GBAtemp Fan

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    Some sites i goto say you need a 30 Watt iron while others say anything above a 15 Watt can burn the leads on the board

    SO any clarification on this subject?

    Went to radio shack and got a cheapo 15 Watt iron $9 (Only gonna use for 7 wires not gonna waste the money on a $50+ for only 1 use

    I also got a older 30 Watt Iron that i been using for practice and i have noticed it easily burns the lacquer on the board i been soldering to (Just a RC motor to a board that has a switch that i cannibalized) and the leads do sometimes come off
     
  2. krazykirk

    Member krazykirk GBAtemp Fan

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    In delicate electronics, it seems the lower the wattage, the better. Heat and electronics don't mix too well. Just stick with the 15W and you'll be fine.
     
  3. Jack-Of-Trades
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    Member Jack-Of-Trades GBAtemp Fan

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    Sweet TYVM fun part was trying to hit wal-mart up for solder that had lead in it (so it can actually be used for a low temp iron) They didnt have any [​IMG] Went to radioshack and got
    1.5 oz. roll of 0.022 Dia. "High Tech * Rosin - Core * Silver - Bearing Solder 62/36/2
     
  4. hankchill

    Member hankchill I Pwn n00bs.

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    Agree with krazykirk.

    I soldered chips myself and a 15 watt iron was best to use on electronics. I tried once with a 30 Watt iron and burned out a PS2 motherboard.
     
  5. Jack-Of-Trades
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    Member Jack-Of-Trades GBAtemp Fan

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    I need to learn more control with mine

    Bought some 8 Pin retention contacts and some IC Boards to practice with... (they both came with 2)
    And i failed my first soldering atempt

    But considering it was my first time 1 passing was excellent (put it in wrong though lol the litle indent i wanted it at top shouldn't hurt but now i got to remember that or get it not working

    (keep in mind i never seen any one solder)

    I took the 62/36/2 rosin core solder .22 dia.

    And was touching the solder to the tip and rushing the tip down to put it on the contact LMFAO
    but i did end up with usable one Thankfully the board came with um what ever its called to keep solder from sticking to it (it feels kinda sticky to the hand though)

    but now i know how to solder correctly Heating the contact and applying solder there Thank you youtube

    now i just have to wait for my wire and chip to arrive And im copying one chip i seen where a dude is using one of the ic boards and some standoffs (Old school PSX) mounted to the shield over the board

    But a question should i reuse the solder already on the psx contact, add more or remove and replace it?


    And a word of advice to people that do buy a board for a 8 Pin PIC Modchip
    the radio shack one i got is terrible quality the contact strip side is fine but on the reverse the holes in it are umm chiped so it's a little ugly (what hapens if you try to use to big of a screwdriver in a piece of plastic it gets widened out) not sure if it was just mine or what but $2.99 for a small board you would expect it to be a better quality

    And getting stabbed by a PIC chip hurts... ( i got hit with 3 pins in my finger when i put together the 2 contacts and pulled the apart)

    The stuff I'm using extra

    [​IMG]
    Dual General-Purpose IC PC Board (this is false advertisement the contacts on mine form instore are copper not the silver color (Same model number though)

    [​IMG]
    8-Pin Retention Contact (socket so i don't have to solder directly to the chip)
    Complete any computer or electronic circuit board project with this 8-Pin Retention Contact. Its features include solder-type DIP IC sockets and a closed-bottom design to help prevent wicking and flux contamination. Also includes a wide entry area for easy IC insertion

    [​IMG]
    10mm Insulated Standoffs (4-Pack)
     

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