Tony Hawk: Pro Skater HD to be delisted from Steam

Discussion in 'GBAtemp & Scene News' started by Chary, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. CheatFreak47

    CheatFreak47 Complex Donut

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    This is is a clear cut case of a game being pulled because the publisher no longer has the rights to the licenses involved, which is generally why this happens. Publishers usually won't just pull a game all willy nilly. It's not a good idea for you to suddenly stop selling your games, because that caps how much money you can ever make off of it.

    What would you rather they do? Just silently remove the game from the store and not give anyone the chance to pick it up if it interests them? Or should the publishers just slowly bleed money away on maintaining the licenses for the IP therein for eternity? Or better yet, make no video games that aren't original intellectual properties?

    There's no clean solution to this issue.
     
    Last edited by CheatFreak47, Jul 12, 2017
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  2. Thirty3Three

    Thirty3Three Musician Member

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    Wherever you want me, baby.
    Isn't that that sex toy thing?



    Also... loved the original. Should I pick this up?

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    Also if I delete it can I redownliad it?


    ALSO, any secret characters or just like... Officer Dick?
     
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  3. Saiyan Lusitano

    Saiyan Lusitano GBAtemp Guru

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    I didn't grow up playing Tony Hawk Pro Skater on PS1 but I did play it a couple of months ago and the graphics looked pretty good so if anything, I wouldn't mind playing that over this HD version if it becomes unavailable legally.
     
  4. CheatFreak47

    CheatFreak47 Complex Donut

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    Okay, in order:
    No, the device you are thinking of is a Sybian, notice the absence of an "m" there.
    Maybe pick it up (the game, not the sex toy har har) if you'd like to try it, but don't expect it to be quite as good as some of the older ones. The controls are familiar but physics are rather strange feeling.
    Yes, you can redownload it as much as you want, steam never revokes download rights. Ever.
    And there definitely is officer dick in the HD remake.
     
    Last edited by CheatFreak47, Jul 12, 2017
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  5. Ev1l0rd

    Ev1l0rd (⌐◥▶◀◤) Knight of Void

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    No, it's a VERY old mobile phone operating system. More popularly known for being installed on Nokia's (remember when those were a thing), but I cannot guarantee that at least some of the instances of the OS weren't installed on sex toys.
     
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  6. Steena

    Steena GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Notice the "This may not have been done on purpose but . . ."
    My point is this is an amazing opportunity to get media coverage in a time where even most new games don't get the chance to get any, and it will no doubt get abused with that intent down the line. For example, a number of good games released within the BOTW/horizon/automata window have seen horrible sales because media was busy talking about the bigger titles. Getting coverage is essential in a flooded industry.
    Also, as I stated, you can put products back on steam with the insanely low entry fee. A 20 year old remaster doesn't make your company go bankrupt if you pull it off from steam from some time either, you can rest assured activision won't go down with this drastic move.

    Solution? I didn't offer a solution, I made an observation. Do a google search with "tony hawk" right now, you'll find the first page completely filled with this very piece of news about THPS HD, overshadowing new games or anything else. When was the last time a (poorly made) 2012 remaster of a 1999 game got this much attention 5 years down the line?

    We have companies starting kickstarters that were already funded, exclusively to get the media boost out of the campaign bringing the buzz because kickstarter projects are very good at that. Now imagine spending the 100 dollars required to re-upload a game on steam to get the same media boosting (the boost would have happened when you pulled it down). Add to that the fact that you have no limitations to pull a game off steam and put it back on, this act is not policed, only the current release that's being sent is policed in a vacuum. It will get abused, because it's easy, currently legal/allowed, and it works (people getting a sense of urgency to own something that may get lost forever; it may obtain some worth over time because it's not sold anymore; and the aforementioned free marketing campaign). I hope we can see the number of sales the game will get until it's pulled and have it compared with its lifetime sales.

    I remember PS4s with the silent hills demo installed being sold for $1000. Infact, the news of konami pulling it down received far, far more coverage than the release itself back then. It was clearly not a marketing strategy either, my point is it works as one if you want it to be.
     
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  7. smileyhead

    smileyhead I am DEFINITELY a madman with a box.

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    WHAT?! :rofl2:
    LOL
    thank you.
     
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  8. CheatFreak47

    CheatFreak47 Complex Donut

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    The problem is nobody will give a shit if the game isn't fucking Tony Hawk, Grand Theft Auto or something.
    The reason this is notable isn't just because the game is being delisted, it's notable because it is a popular or well-known game or franchise that is being delisted.

    This kind of shit wouldn't make the news if it's baby's first indie game on steam being pulled for some arbitrary reason.
    The game, in order to be newsworthy, needed to have made a name for itself in the first place, and has to be pulled for a reason. Context for this shit is everything.

    Also, the specific logic flow you presented is applicable to basically only this game and maybe only a handful of others- how many other poorly done remake/remasters of a popular franchise have you seen that could potentially capitalize on a sort of "cancerous marketing tactic"?

    Even if some smaller developer could pull something like this for exposure, there's only two outcomes to that; a good game gets a bunch of exposure that it didn't necessarily deserve, or a shitty game does, people find out that it's shitty, and then the developer becomes infamous once everyone catches onto the scam.

    Addressing couple more of your supporting points: Even if the game does gain "value" over time, it'll only maintain that value if the game is in a volatile and transferrable state- something that active steam games are not, I can't exactly sell my Steam account to someone just for one game that isn't being sold any more without losing access to hundreds of other games- and games that are transferrable are worthless once they are activated because of that, meaning any value they have becomes sentimental to the user that activated it only. The controversy surrounding Silent Hills being pulled extended well beyond a simple open/shut case of a game being pulled for license issues, not to mention Silent Hill being a popular franchise, and Konami stood to gain nothing by pulling it but infamy.

    Your post, to me at least- looked a lot like outrage that you fabricated to fit a pre-existing opinion, probably a very anti-corporatist one at that, but I don't like to assume things usually.
     
    Last edited by CheatFreak47, Jul 12, 2017
  9. Thirty3Three

    Thirty3Three Musician Member

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    Wherever you want me, baby.
    Thanks man.

    The physicals on the Sybian cause a strange feeling? I'm sure. I've never had anything up there before...

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    Oh you were talking about the game not the sybian
     
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  10. tbb043

    tbb043 Member

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    Worse than that, they changed people's "purchases" from native versions to ports of the mobile versions with the changed soundtrack. You don't buy a steam game, you just rent it for as long as the don't decide to fuck with it.
     
  11. CheatFreak47

    CheatFreak47 Complex Donut

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    That gave me a good laugh, yes I meant the game, not the sex toy. :rofl2:
     
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  12. tbb043

    tbb043 Member

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    It's absolutely fair, they already got paid. you dont' pay the architect again when you sell the same house 10 years later.
     
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  13. Psionic Roshambo

    Psionic Roshambo GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    Oh now this is news, $1.99 for an HD remake of THPS? Sold! lol
     
  14. Thirty3Three

    Thirty3Three Musician Member

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    Wherever you want me, baby.
    I was at work, and my mind was horribly in eight-thousand places. I actually didn't catch on that you weren't talking about the sex toy. (Sex MACHINE?)

    I laughed at my stupidity while heading to my break hahaha!
     
  15. MasterJ360

    MasterJ360 GBAtemp Fan

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    I used to say I love the idea of having licensed music from popular artists in games, but that was a decade ago then again we actually had good music in the early 2000's to boot. Now its just unnecessary on both sides of the blade developers have to pay more than they should have and we have the ability to use our own soundtracks during gameplay
     
  16. Steena

    Steena GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    http://www.pcgamer.com/earth-year-2066-a-20-early-access-game-pulled-from-steam/
    https://www.pcgamesn.com/ruse/ruse-...d-its-website-deleted-due-to-licensing-issues
    http://www.bit-tech.net/news/gaming/pc/unigen-superposition-benchmark/1/
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/dec/16/hatred-shooter-removed-from-steam-gaming-site

    Just a quick google search, page 2 already started having irrelevant games. Page 2, of google. Companies pay money for that.

    You don't have to assume things or use opinions to know that shock-news and controversy is more likely to make the news. Hatred is a great example of a no-reputation poor game that from the very beginning gathered a ton of attention over a political debate about violence in videogames, getting a ton of ideological support, coverage and views over a short trailer. You could use hundreds of years of the existence of the press instead. Your steam account argument holds little relevance because even if you don't sell it, some people are enticed to own it because it may not be available anymore. It's also a staple used for marketing where you claim that it's the last day for what is really a daily special discount so you better hurry now! You can also create a new account and purchase the game on it in 3 minutes if you wanted to sell that individually or somehow preserve the game in that state on its own account.
    Yes, the games stop being perceived as valuable if they get put back on steam, but the profit has already been made the moment the media announces it was pulled back. It doesn't matter if the game now goes back to its original perceived value, the sale boost has already happened, and by keeping/selling the removed game only middlemen would get the money, not the company, so beyond that point doesn't matter anymore. That's why they may as well put it back on steam to continue with their standard sales cycle. Essentially, it's one free sales boost while maintaining your normal sales cycle. You can only gain from it. Just make up some story for a temporary emergency takedown like a possible copyright clash that needed fixing, then change an asset. There you go, your game has now been covered by the media for free and you get to keep selling it in the future.

    Even the first GTA itself became an instant huge hit from day one despite having no history because it had a massive controversy surrounding it, which got into actual politics debates and television, same for Mortal Kombat. And as I stated already, a few percentage of new releases gets covered at all cause there's so much stuff out all the time. An existing game making the news over them is huge because they generally fall into oblivion after the first week.
     
  17. CheatFreak47

    CheatFreak47 Complex Donut

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    I fail to see how this is applicable in this particular case. The stem of your argument is that the person selling their product is "abusing the system" to get people to look at it, and are doing so under a false pretense- possibly with the intent of selling the same product again afterwards.

    A case of Activision losing the Tony Hawk License, and the agreements therein' leading to game being pulled has nothing to do with causing some kind of slippery slope fall leading to endless marketing scams, and the line you drew between them is miles long and has a thousand loops, breaks, and ends.

    If everyone made purchasing decisions the way you want, people wouldn't be able to buy basically anything without "supporting a cancerous practice somewhere." I say people should just buy whatever the fuck they want, whenever they want.

    It's a free market, if something sucks enough, it'll fail on it's own.
     
    Last edited by CheatFreak47, Jul 13, 2017
  18. Sticksandstones

    Sticksandstones GBAtemp Regular

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    My theory is that the game sucked too much for Steam. I felt like I was playing a joke mod of the classics. The graphics and ragdoll bails were nice, but the gameplay was awful. Good thing I have THPS2x for Xbox! That game kicks ass!
     
  19. duwen

    duwen Old Man Yoshi

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    Unfortunately, this kind of thing isn't new - it's a sad repercussion of digital/downloadable media, and has been happening for as long as there have been digital marketplaces for game downloads.
    Most publishers/developers don't advertise delistings due to licensing issues (even though they could benefit from a significant sales bump) as they see it reflecting badly on themselves for not securing trademarks/licenses for longer periods of time or neglecting to renegotiate new licensing deals. Think Sega delisting Outrun when they lost the Ferrari license, Capcom delisting MvC2, MvC Origins and MvC3 when their Marvel license expired (since renegotiated for the re-issue of MvC3 and the upcoming MvCInfinite), among others...
    ...but Activision are money-grabbing a-holes that will squeeze every last penny out of anything they can. They used to regularly announce 'soon to be delisted' Guitar/Band/DJ Hero dlc in the hopes of forcing a few extra sales. This is no different.

    I wouldn't be surprised if the logical future of music licensing in videogames ends up following a dlc model; where the core game only contains first party/royalty free music, and licensed music is only available as dlc content for as long as the license is paid up.
    GTA6 - You only get Talk Radio for free, every other station is $9.99 each and subject to removal whenever a license expires... but at least the game will still be available!
     
  20. Steena

    Steena GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    The massive success of the app store where looking for quality is an alien concept and buying reviews is not only normal, but absolutely 100% required to get any sort of visibility, proves you wrong. Several talented mobile devs stated this and they were forced to do steam ports because quality doesn't get recognized at all there, yet it's the most profitable platform of them all by a massive, massive margin. Ironically speaking, once greenlight hit the steam store, a much larger % of terrible games got the spotlight over the deserving games before the feature was implemented. That means, the situation actively got worse overall because the system was left for free exploitation. And surprisingly, a ton of companies exploited it.

    The way Kickstarter usage evolved as an additional marketing campaign for A and AA titles, completely defeating the core of the idea in a comical manner, proves you wrong.

    The way early access got completely out of hand and has very quickly mostly being used with a malevolent intent (an actual plan to never finish the game in the first place and just move onto the next early access project instead, itself designed to remain forever early access - in some cases we even see cash shops or expansions being sold for early access games, which is hilarious) proves you wrong.

    The way founders packs became more and more intrusive and game-ruining proves you wrong.

    You have things that have no regulations and you leave them like they are and companies that exist to make profit will inevitably exploit it because that's why they exist. It's not evil anti-corporate tinfoil hat propaganda, it's literally how the world works at any business level. My boss owned a tiny ass business and exploited the fuck out of everyone the moment they showed a sign of ignorance or agreeableness, because if you didn't, the competition would take it. And if it gets out? Pay the small 10k EUR fee to start the business under a new name and you still end up in net positive, because you're so small people won't connect your old businesses. Just like what asset flip indie devs operate step by step in the game industry, not incidentally. So no, leaving shit that is easy to exploit in every possible way "to the market" doesn't work, as greenlight has been pulled after years of thousands of scams should convince you. You need some sort of baseline policy/guidelines at the very least, of which pulling games in and out of the steam store at your leisure once they've been approved once has absolutely none of.
    The example is the same. You are absolutely allowed to do an emergency takedown of your own game if you believe a copyright clash may happen (infact you can just do that without giving any reason whatsoever), then you are allowed to put it back on after an investigation and making sure now everything is alright, after you pay the tragic, business-destroying sum of . . . $100. You don't have to provide any documentation or testimony or proof that this actually happened, you can simply do it. So I don't see how this mechanism would be any different than a legitimate music copyright licensing issue, to the end consumer. Game was up, game gets pulled down, media covers it, more people are enticed to own it now than they were before. The end result is the exact same, only thing that changes is the legitimacy of the reason for the takedown. And since there is absolutely no repercussion for it at this time, this difference is irrelevant.