Need to disable Turbo Boost

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by the_randomizer, Jan 23, 2013.

Jan 23, 2013
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    the_randomizer The Temp's official fox whisperer

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    Now, before people jump/attack me for saying something so bold as to want to disable such a feature, I have legitimate reasons.

    1 - Numerous people have reported that turning Turbo Boost off does reduce performance to a degree, but at the same time, allow the CPU to reach safer temperatures under load, increasing the longevity of the laptop in question.

    These thread here also attest to this:
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1435088
    http://tautvidas.com/blog/2011/04/disabling-intel-turbo-boost/

    While I plan on getting a desktop in the near future (I hope), I want to do everything I can to reduce CPU temps.
    c
    Naturally, Lenovo was stupid and disallows users from changing in the BIOS, however, by going to Control Panel -> Power options -> High Performance->Change Power Plans, and then to advanced settings, you change the max processor stat to 99% instead of 100% while keeping the minimum state less than the max state. This has reportedly reduce temps as much as 15 Celsius, heck, even 5-8 Celsius on my CPU would be a welcome change.

    My question is, will making these changes shorten the lifespan and/or damage the CPU in any way whatsoever? I am well aware of the consequence of slight performance reductions.
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    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    I still fail to see how disabling Turbo Boost will drop the temperature.

    The way Turbo Boost works is that if there is only one active thread it will increase clock speed while disabling other cores. If there are four active threads it will use all four cores at lower clock speed. In essence it does

    * Increase clock speed and disabling core(s)
    * Decrease clock speed and enabling core(s)

    You can think of Turbo Boost as a power saving features. You only disable Turbo Boost for one reason, that is to overclock. At stock speed it makes no sense to disable Turbos Boost.

    If you want to limit CPU temperature then simply impose a performance cap (underclock). Underclock does not hurt CPU lifespan.

    If you are handy take apart of your Laptop and re-apply thermal paste. You'll be surprised how sloppy OEM can be when it comes to thermal paste. Thermal paste will make a bigger difference.
    Last edited by trumpet-205, Jan 23, 2013
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    Originality Chibi-neko

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    Let me just add, my PB media laptop didn't come with any thermal paste. Adding my own decreased temperatures by up to 15C.
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    DaggerV Archmagi of the Emerald Moon

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    That makes me want to check mine, but I havn't had heat issues really.
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    the_randomizer The Temp's official fox whisperer

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    Wait, you can set a limit to the clock frequency!?

    Okay, I tested it without Turbo Boost and it ran cooler for simple programs (Chrome), but more intensive ones, yeah, it was a no-brainer there. As for taking apart the laptop, I have neither the experience nor the confidence in doing so. IIRC, most manufacturers' warranties are void if the CPU is tampered with (in this case, reapplying thermal paste). While I certainly wouldn't mind something like Arctic Silver and I have no doubt that would help tremendously. Again, I simply haven't the skills to dissemble the laptop to get to the CPU, as it's more often than not a real pain in the a** to reach the CPU, is it not? It's my first laptop and for me to try and access the CPU to put new paste on would only lead me to ruining the thing, based off of my past luck and track record.

    By the by, how do you set a limit to the CPU frequency? My f***ing BIOS' CPU features are locked as I have stated many times before.
    Last edited by the_randomizer, Jan 23, 2013
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    war2thegrave New Member

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    I still think you are making this issue much bigger than it needs to be.
    Look up your model number in a search engine.
    If there are notebooks dying due to overheating issues you will certainly find out.
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    Sakitoshi everything is going according the plan...

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    power settings -> change plan settings -> change advanced plan settings -> processor power management
    there you can limit the cpu usage in percentages, i personally limit mine to 70% in the "sakiconomizer" plan, i got like 1 extra hour of battery.
    and with the temp problem, what temperatures you see under heavy load??
    is normal get temperatures of 80~85°C under full cpu usage(playing borderlands 2 is a good example, i get 82-83°C)
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    Originality Chibi-neko

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    So that's where it was. I knew it was in there somewhere...
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    the_randomizer The Temp's official fox whisperer

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    Close the thread, the issue is resolved since I had a shop put on new thermal paste; Lenovo did a horrible job when they did it.
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    Sakitoshi everything is going according the plan...

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    how did the temperatures drop??
    im curious and planing doing the same to my laptop and maybe on a friend's too by myself(i have experience disassembling computers in general) if the cpu can run cool, my friend laptop can go up to 90°C if not on a cooling base or with a ventilator near.
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    the_randomizer The Temp's official fox whisperer

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    It will take a while for the paste to harden, so I won't see any drops for a while. If you can, have someone do it for you.
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    Celice New Member

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    Uh...? For it to harden? I'm definitely no enthusiast, but from various overclock sites and subreddits, most people want to get the CPU running as soon as possible so that the heatsink can naturally spread the paste around with its even presure. This includes using the heat to "smooth out" the paste along the face of the processor.

    I mean, it sounds more like the place that applied the paste for you is suggesting advice that may not really be advice, as much as it's words to sound professional.
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    Foxi4 Shotgun to the face is not a contingency plan.

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    Figures. Stock paste is usually crap.

    If you continue to have temperature issues, send me a PM and I'll guide you through some performance-increasing procedures - kinda too long-winded to post it in a thread without making it seem like a tutorial. :P
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    Originality Chibi-neko

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    After applying thermal paste, it's advised to fix the heatsink on quickly to make sure airborne dust/dirt/contaminants are minimised. It's also advised to fix the heatsink in a cross formation to ensure even pressure and that the paste is spread out properly.

    Once the thermal paste is properly applied and the heatsink in place, then turning on the PC will generate heat that will "set" the thermal paste. At this point, let me remind you that another name for thermal paste is ceramic paste. Optimal thermal exchange won't occur until the thermal paste has fully set (or hardened), but the difference is only a degree or two. Usually you can see how effective the thermal paste is with just an hour of use.

    ...who said heat magically makes thermal paste become "smoother", or that heat spreads the thermal paste for a "more even" application? That's like saying you can make jelly change shapes by heating it up!
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    Celice New Member

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    By smooth, I meant in the same semantic sense as 'set.'

    As I said, I'm no enthusiast, so at times the specific jargon may elude me. Thankfully peeps like you exist to include clarification.
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    the_randomizer The Temp's official fox whisperer

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    Arctic Silver CPU guide mentions that the paste "breaks in" over a certain period of time and that results aren't instantaneous. Not harden after applying and before putting the heatsink on, but as you use the machine.


    Bollocks, that came out wrong. I meant to say "after you fasten the heatsink and reassemble the machine". As you use it, the pastes "breaks in" and the desired results happen after so many hours of use.
    Last edited by the_randomizer, Jan 29, 2013

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