Learning Japanese - The Nihongo FAQ

Discussion in 'General Tutorials' started by Densetsu, May 1, 2011.

May 1, 2011
  1. Februarysn0w

    Member Februarysn0w GBAtemp Maniac

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    oh.. that correct. sorry. 私はとても元気です。良かったら私に英語を教えて下さい。
     
    Last edited by Februarysn0w, Nov 23, 2015


  2. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    もちろん!でも、私の日本語はあまり上手くないです。あなたは日本人ですか?
    :)
     
  3. Februarysn0w

    Member Februarysn0w GBAtemp Maniac

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    My English is bad too. 気にせずお話しましょう。時々英語で返事しますので修正してくれると嬉しいです。
     
  4. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    I can correct your English for sure, you can ask me anything you want :)
     
  5. Februarysn0w

    Member Februarysn0w GBAtemp Maniac

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    thank you so much. where you live in? Do you study Japanese?
     
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  6. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    I live in Sweden, up in the northern parts of Europe. I study Japanese by myself, not in any class, so I learn really slowly! :)
     
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  7. Weyu

    Member Weyu GBAtemp Regular

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    Cool thread.
    Good idea with the magnets on the fridge, repetition is key with things like this.

    Another important factor is application. What I always tell people to do when learning kanji is to learn actual words, not kanji by themselves because you don't have anything to associate them with in that case except for the pictographs themselves.
    When you learn compounds you can remember the on'yomi for several characters at once. A good way is to write them down (on paper to practice, or on your palm with a finger works too) and read out loud what you just wrote.
    And once you're familiar with it, you can take it a step further and apply the stuff you learned to form sentences.

    The more you play with it the more you will retain and longer as well.
     
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  8. flame1234

    Member flame1234 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    A problem I have sometimes: I need example sentences with this word I don't know in them, preferably with English translation. Are there resources for that?

    Another problem I have sometimes: I need a Japanese definition of a word because either the word is not in the JA->EN dictionary (rare), or because I think the definition of word in the JA->EN dictionary sucks. Also, many collocations aren't in the JA->EN dictionary (although some are). My go-to is to type the word or phrase into Google and see what comes up- it's usually dictionaries.

    Another problem I have sometimes often: Very common JA phrases like よろしくお願いします are/should be translated differently depending on the situation. See here. Is there a list of them and examples of the different usages? A lot of the ones that don't really mean much I have trouble with: やっぱり, やはり, さすがに, etc...

    Next one: Where can I go for help with editing? For example: さすがに = as one would expect. OK, but for editing reasons I need to see several examples of it properly localized to know what it's supposed to sound like in English. Because the localized version isn't remotely close to the literal translation.

    Last one: How do I not be annoying when asking for TL help? I do many hours of TL a day- is posting one sentence a day too much, leaving help on the table, or about right?
     
  9. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    Just saw a thing on a Youtube video, and I'll assume it's correct. But I'll just have to ask why here :)
    It's about verb conjugation with TE form, and the following info is probably correct.

    Verbs ending in: う, つ and る replaces those hiragana with って
    Verbs ending in: む, ぶ and ぬ replaces those hiragana with んで
    Verbs ending in: く replace that hiragana with いて
    Verbs ending in: ぐ replace that hiragana with いで
    Verbs ending in: す replace that hiragana with して

    And then there's an exeption on the following word: 行く
    行く would conjugate to 行いて by the rules above, but is actually conjugated to 行って. This is also presented in the video.
    Now WHY is that? Is it just an exeption without a clear reason, or is it because of something else? :)
     
  10. Weyu

    Member Weyu GBAtemp Regular

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    Google 和英辞書 and you'll get plenty of results for example sentences.

    As for よろしくお願いします, this is a very common problem with beginning translators, they have the misconception that every word in the JP needs to be translated to EN. Nothing could be further from the truth.
    When you do this the result ends up being far too literal most of the time and completely unnatural since the languages just don't work that way.

    I'm not going through all of them in that link, but take this one for example:

    The issue with that sentence is that it's a a direct translation. A useful tip is to think or say out loud what you just wrote, and ask yourself: "Would anyone say this like that or is it not real English?"
    If the answer is negative, then dig a little deeper and try to find a solution in natural English.

    This ties in with your editing problem as well— this is where you put your English and writing skills to use.
    The main thing you need to do is to grasp the meaning of what the person is trying to say, and then translate it to something that makes sense in English and also fits the personality of the character.

    In the sentence above, the character is clearly asking for help, so that's what you need to convey.
    Very simply, it could be "I'll be counting on you when I'm ready!" You can omit the 師匠 as well if it's only these two people talking, which is another common pitfall. In English people rarely call other people's names in such conversations, while it's common to do so in Japanese, so you need to take that in account.
    Basically, you have to use your brain and figure out what makes most sense and sounds pleasing too.
    Which involves reading over what you just wrote, not just for errors but also for the quality of the writing and adjusting it if necessary.

    If it's a sassy or serious character, you can adjust for that by altering your word choice or sentence construction for example. A good habit to form is to proofread your work right after you write something, and also read it at least once as a whole to see if it all fits together.
    If you don't do that, then you just got sentences that are translated one by one rather than as a dialogue.

    Translation and writing is hard work as you probably already know, but the most intensive part is the QC, which many people cheat on, even supposed professionals do it. But all it takes are a couple ugly mistakes here and there for people to write off your work.

    So if you wanna do it right, it takes time and effort. :)

    Verbs ending with る can also be masu stem + て without the small tsu.
    行く conjugates to 行って because it's an irregular verb along with Suru.

    There's a ton of info about this on the net that could explain it way more in-depth than I can in a forum post, so you should just google "Japanese verb types."

    One thing though, don't learn them as "U-verbs" and "Ru-verbs" which you often see taught to Americans as a crutch, but this is wrong.
    You should find an explanation that tells you what ichidan and godan verbs are, otherwise you will run into problems later.
     
  11. Ubuntuの刀

    Member Ubuntuの刀 :^D

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    This thread shall not die. It was the birth of something good. Time2bump.
     
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  12. kprovost7314

    Member kprovost7314 I AM 14, NOT 25!

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    Kanji Study and Kanji Senpai are good apps.
     
  13. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    I appreciate that! Do you have any questions or something to share?

    Nice, why are they good? Are they better than other apps, or are they just "good" like many others? :)
     
  14. chaosrunner
    This message by chaosrunner has been removed from public view by Minox, Apr 26, 2016, Reason: Offtopic shitpost.
    Apr 26, 2016
  15. kprovost7314

    Member kprovost7314 I AM 14, NOT 25!

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    Well, Kanji Senpai has an SRS feature (that all great Japanese apps have) and it features packs and audio of N5-N1 Kanji. Kanji Study has a free and upgradable version. The free version comes with beginner kanji (N5 only I think) and all kana. The full version has customizable lists, all N5-N1 Kanji, and different types of quizzes. They're both on Android.
     
  16. Issac

    Global Moderator Issac oh!

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    -snip-
    This isn't the EOF, so one-word posts (that doesn't contribute in any way) isn't really helpful. Do you have a question, or something to share?

    Alright! That's really helpful information. Have you tried any other apps that you have something to say about? (If you know more good ones, or ones that you should avoid because they suck et.c.)

    I really like the app "Human Japanese", and I had the paid version for apple devices a LONG time ago. Now there are several apps in that series, with a lot more content. It's not a Kanji learning app, but more of a Japanese learning app. There's a free version to try out, and some day I'll buy the full version. (Available on Android (and probably iPhone still)).
     
  17. kprovost7314

    Member kprovost7314 I AM 14, NOT 25!

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    Well I'll avoid the Japanese app by Bravolol. It has terms on it but it's not really helpful for the common Japanese learner.
     
  18. Ubuntuの刀

    Member Ubuntuの刀 :^D

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    Yes, actually. There is this Japanese Learning Server I'm a part of on discord(which is a pretty popular video/chat service that's expanding)
    https://discord.gg/0udetoehNfxehNHY this is the link to the server, so anyone is free to join it if they want ^^
     
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  19. kprovost7314

    Member kprovost7314 I AM 14, NOT 25!

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    Came to pay my respects to Dentetsu. If it wasn't for him and this guide, I would have never learned Japanese.

    おやすみなさい。
     
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  20. Wendell Scott

    Newcomer Wendell Scott Member

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    I know, I'm very late, but I just wanted to pay my respects to Dentetsu as well. Thank you for this amazing guide and your many years on this site.
     
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  21. heartysupper

    Newcomer heartysupper Member

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    Thank you so much for making the guide! I've been studying Japanese for 6 years on and off, and I've become quite good at listening (thanks to all the japanese dorama and interesting TV shows, lol), but my problem is... I hardly ever practice writing, and I'm really lazy at reading. I read my favorite mangas all in English :'(

    My question is, for those who are learning Japanese, how do you improve yourself in writing & reading? How do you find your motivation and what's your trick to keep it?

    Thank you for sharing :)
     

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